Is starting a sentence with "what is more" correct?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Saklig, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. Saklig Senior Member

    Denmark
    Hi

    Is starting a sentence with "what is more" correct?
    Here is the context:


    Also, Many third world countries experince decreased interest for their own culture and vernacular slang.

    What is more, there might be an increased egalitarian society with moderen global consumer economy.
     
  2. Blootix Senior Member

    California
    English - USA
    This is technically incorrect. I would use "moreover."

     
  3. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    I don't think it's incorrect at all. It is an accepted standard phrase.

    some synonyms of "what is more" are:

    Additionally
    Moreover
    Furthermore
    Also
    And
     
  4. Blootix Senior Member

    California
    English - USA
    Would you use that in formal writing though? I was taught not to use it in writing.
     
  5. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    I don't think it's especially informal.

    Even if it were especially informal, it doesn't mean it's incorrect.
     
  6. katie_here Senior Member

    England
    England/English
    I was also taught never to start a sentence with and and also as they are additions to what has just been said previously.

    For example.

    I like apples and I like pears too. To write I like apples. And I like pears too is wrong.


    Moreover, is correct.
     
  7. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    There are some circumstances where ". And" works. It is not wrong. In the old days, there was a period where, as you say, ". And" was discouraged. That is not necessarily the case these days.

    If anything, it's a stylistic choice.
     
  8. Saklig Senior Member

    Denmark
    Thanks everybody. However, could someone please explain to me why "moreover" is more suitable than "what is more"?
     
  9. I think it's a stylistic choice, as nzfauna suggests. I personally intensely dislike moreover, it seems to be reserved for use in studenty essays.

    In your example I can't really see a reason for using either, but it would depend on wider context, flow of arguments and similar factors.
     

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