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Is there another name for a little male chicken?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by ofriendragon, Jul 11, 2008.

  1. How do natives call a little male chicken? I mean a cock that has not been (fully) mature yet.(maybe it cannot be called a cock yet?)

    I want to make a dish from this kind of cocks , how can I make its name understood (that it is made from this kind of cocks)?



    Many many thanks!
     
  2. Kevin Beach

    Kevin Beach Senior Member

    cockerel..........
     
  3. liliput

    liliput Senior Member

    Spain
    U.K. English
    I didn't know the difference until I looked it up just now but a male chicken that's less than one year old is a cockerel, after one year it's a cock or a rooster.

    Telling a native that the dish is made from small cocks will cause more than a few raised eyebrows.
     
  4. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    A capon is specifically a cock that's had its important parts removed.
     
  5. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    Capon:A capon is a rooster (a male chicken) whose reproductive functions were removed at a young age. Typically the castration is performed when the chicken is between 6 and 20 weeks old. The benefits are a non-aggressive male that can serve as a mother for baby chicks. They also produce ample, tender meat when butchered and as such are a choice poultry meat in some locales.
    Due to the high fat content, they are self-basting.
    The caponisation of poultry is banned in the United Kingdom on animal welfare grounds, though the meat itself is not illegal.

    From thecookinginn.com
     
  6. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    By the way, whenever I've eaten in restaurants here in NZ, I've only seen reference to "baby chicken".
     
  7. A capon's meat may not be that tender if it is old, a baby chicken's may not make people that energetic if it not from a male one, but a cockerel's is another story, heihei...
    In China, there may be some sex worship ingredients in this dish? Whatever to say, it is nutrient, energetic and especially, delicious.

    Thank you all!
     
  8. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    Huh? I don't think your Chinese culinary concepts have translated into English well. :) In fact, they sound utterly ridiculous. What are you actually trying to say? And is it relevant to the post?
     
  9. liliput

    liliput Senior Member

    Spain
    U.K. English
    I believe the suggestion is that the dish has aphrodisiac properties.
     
  10. I haven't got a proper name for this dish. It's really hard to translate a thing that carries cultural factors.
    Hope it is relevant to my original post.

    Thank you again.


    re: I believe the suggestion is that the dish has aphrodisiac properties.
    Yes ---to some degree.
     

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