"It is I, and the Republic, who owes you thanks."

Discussion in 'English Only' started by James Bates, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. James Bates Senior Member

    English America
    This is from "Star Wars: The Clone Wars": "No, Master Skywalker, it is I, and the Republic, who owes you thanks."

    Is this grammatically correct?
     
  2. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I feel a bit uncomfortable answering the question you've posed since you appear to be a native speaker of English but yes, this strikes me as a perfectly correct use of a cleft sentence.

    I think in a rapid colloquial speech "it is me, and the Republic" would pass unnoticed, but I'd stick with "I".

    I think it's "owes" since it has to correspond to the subject which in this case is "IT"
     
  3. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    No. The subject of the verb is plural ("who"="I and the Republic"); the verb must agree. And two of the commas shouldn't be there. It should read "...it is I and the Republic who owe you thanks." Substitute "we" for "I and the Republic" and you'll see; you wouldn't say "we owes you thanks", would you?
     
  4. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I gather then Parla that scriptwriters made a grammatical error? It's rather hard to imagine since it was such a big production, and there must've been a lot of proofreading. :eek:
     
  5. word gumshoe Senior Member

    TEHRAN IRAN
    persian
    Yes it is correct.That is cleft sentence
     
  6. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Hollywood scriptwriters don't know what proofreaders are, DL. (One gets the impression ...)
     
  7. word gumshoe Senior Member

    TEHRAN IRAN
    persian
    and the Republic
    I think this sentence function is like appositive

     
  8. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Whether you view the verb as going with "I" or with "I and the republic" in either case the verb form should be "owe". I can't see how "owes" could possibly be right here.
     
  9. It could have been the actor's error. Directors are not going to stop filming and ordering retakes for every slip of the tongue - even if they notice them.

    Rover
     
  10. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    Just to clarify --- the subject for the verb is not IT, the subject is I (and the Republic). It should be owe because the subject is either I or we ... (as timpeac said #8)
     
  11. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I stand corrected. :)
     
  12. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    Another point is that 'who' is not used for an impersonal subject such as 'the Republic'.
    Therefore the word 'that', which can apply both to personal and impersonal subjects, is needed as relative pronoun here.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2012

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