It is important/easy/... for / to me

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by scorpio1984, Apr 19, 2010.

  1. scorpio1984 Senior Member

    Venezia
    catalan and spanish
    I always have the same doubt: Which is the correct option: For or to me???

    It is important / easy/ or... whatever FOR me
    It is important / easy/...whatever TO me???


    Thanks a lot!
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Both "for" and "to" can be used after "important," but not usually in the same situations. For example:

    It is important to me that you arrive on time.
    It is important for me to arrive on time.


    In the first case, it is your arrival on time that matters to me; in the second it is my arrival on time that is important.

    With "easy," one would almost always use "for":

    It's easy for me to learn Spanish because I already know Portuguese.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2010
  3. pelusazez Junior Member

    Argentina
    spanish
    What's the context? Both could be correct.

    Important + to
    "Studying is important to me" (you feel it)

    Important + for + infinitive
    "It's important for me to learn english because... (leads to something else)

    However, I wouldn't say "it's easy to me".You have to use "for me"
     
  4. verdecillo Junior Member

    English- United States
    It is perhaps also important to note that, in both the above examples, “it” is a syntactic expletive (“dummy pronoun”) which, in reality, has no meaning. However, (since scorpio1984 did not provide a particular context), “it” can also actually stand for a specific noun that was previously mentioned.

    When “it” represents something special or something that holds sentimental value, then you use “to.” For example, if your grandfather gave you a watch, you would have to say “it is important to me.” When “it” stands for a certain object or activity that is physically or emotionally beneficial, you use “for.” For example, if you are emphasizing that eating nutritious foods or getting enough exercise is healthy, you would have to say “it is important for me.”
     
  5. RicardoElAbogado Senior Member

    SF Bay Area, California
    American English
    Wow, I've been using syntactic expletives all my life, and I never knew it!
     
  6. verdecillo Junior Member

    English- United States
    @RicardoElAbogado:

    Haha! :) Maybe my post sounded too pedantic (I study linguistics, so sometimes I get carried away). Nonetheless, I thought that, in this case, I should point that out because many languages, such as Spanish (which is the native language of the original starter of this thread) do not have syntactic expletives, so "it" only exists when "it" refers to a specific thing. When you think about it, in certain English sentences, "it" is actually ridiculous. For example, in the sentence "it rains" what is the "it" referring to? Nothing. "It" in this case only serves as a placeholder. In languages like Spanish, the same sentence is only one word: "llueve" and is not possible any other way.
     
  7. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Right, but even if it doesn't use a subject pronoun before llueve, there's still an implied subject, if only grammatically. And French, by the way, has il pleut.
     
  8. scorpio1984 Senior Member

    Venezia
    catalan and spanish
    Hi again! I've not provided any context because I'd like to know when I have to use each of them in any context, 'cause I ALWAYS have the same doubt... every time I have to write a sentence with this kind of ending "to me/him... /for me..." I never know which preposition I have to use... :(
     
  9. RicardoElAbogado Senior Member

    SF Bay Area, California
    American English
    Prepositions are always tricky since the often don't translate directly.

    If you are going to use the "It is important / easy/ or... whatever" structure, then use "for me."
     
  10. mhp Senior Member

    American English
    This is a very good point. :)
     

Share This Page