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It's always darkest before dawn and other proverbs

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by RomY, Mar 1, 2006.

  1. RomY Junior Member

    Spanish, Buenos Aires
    Hi there,

    I need some help to explain these proverbs and maybe an example to understand them better...

    1. "It's always darkest before dawn" (it gives me this idea that just when you thought things couldn't get worse, well they got worse! Or maybe that you can foresee that something bad is going to happen)

    2. "There are two sides to every question " (questions should be analysed more carefully???)

    3. "Out of sight, out out of mind" (If I don't see it, I don't believe it???)

    4. "It's an ill wind that blows no good /nobody any good" (I know it's something like de aquí no sacaremos nada bueno, but can anybody provide an example when to use it or how to use it?)

    Thanks...
     
  2. aurilla Senior Member

    Puerto Rico
    Am Eng/PR Spanish
    1. "It's always darkest before dawn" - It means things always seem to get worse before they get better, so hang in there and don't despair.It the same as saying "There is light at the end of the tunnel."

    2. "There are two sides to every question." - I believe the actual saying is "There are two sides to every coin." - It means there are two versions to every argument, dispute, situation.

    3. "Out of sight, out out of mind" - It's similar to "Ojos que no ven, corazón que no siente". When you stop seeing the person/thnig you tend to slowly forget them.

    4. "It's an ill wind that blows no good /nobody any good." - You're right, it means "De aquí no sacaremos nada bueno". It's more of a British saying. It's meaning is similar to the saying: "Something smells fishy," when referring that something gives you "mala espina", a bad feeling about something.
     
  3. Monnik

    Monnik Senior Member

    Yo, en México; mi corazón, en Madrid
    Mexico - Spanish/English
    Hello, Romy...

    Let me see if I can help you a little bit.

    1. It is always darkest before dawn. The way I see it, this phrase is intended to give someone hope, since the darkest moment of the night happens just before dawn, when there is a complete absence of light. So, in a way, it is telling you "do not despair, for no matter how dark it might get, there will be light".

    2. There are two sides to every question. I believe what they are trying to say is that there are always two points of view to every story, so we should be careful before reaching any kind of judgement.

    3. Out of sight, out of mind. This reminds me of the Spanish proverb "Ojos que no ven, corazón que no siente". That is, some things don't bother you (should not bother you) so long as you don't see them, which can be interpreted - I think - both in a positive and in a negative way.

    4. Take a look at this: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=57752

    Hope this helped!
     
  4. Sabelotodo Senior Member

    Great Lakes Region, USA
    English, United States
    I hear most often, "There are two sides to every argument."

    I like the more humorous version, "There are three sides to every argument: his side, her side, and the truth.":D
     
  5. RomY Junior Member

    Spanish, Buenos Aires

    Just perfect!!! Thank you so much!
     
  6. Soy Yo Senior Member

    USA
    EEUU - inglés
    It's a wind that blows no good. No hay mal que por bien no venga.
     
  7. aurilla Senior Member

    Puerto Rico
    Am Eng/PR Spanish
    Except one thing: "Ojos que no ven, corazón que no siente" actually means "What you don't know won't hurt you."
     
  8. Monnik

    Monnik Senior Member

    Yo, en México; mi corazón, en Madrid
    Mexico - Spanish/English
    Ok, I feel dumb. I am still confused on this one although there is already a link for it.

    No hay mal que por bien no venga is perfectly understandable. Nothing bad happens without some benefit for someone.

    But... It's an ill wind that blows no good just doesn't seem to have that bit of positivity in it. Where in there do you get the idea that that not all is bad? :confused:
     
  9. Soy Yo Senior Member

    USA
    EEUU - inglés
    The implicit meaning of it's an ill wind that blows no good is:

    Every negative thing (wind) brings some good with it. If not, it's really a bad (ill) wind.

    Or stating it another way: The wind that blows no good is an ill wind (indeed).

    http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=20001110
     
  10. Maya2805 Junior Member

    Toronto, Canada
    Polish, living in Canada
    So is there a proverb like this in Spanish? If not, how would you translate it?
    "It is always darkest before dawn".
     
  11. ILT

    ILT Moderando con moderación

    México
    México - Español/Castellano
    Here are the proverbs that I think are equivalent to yours:
    Después de la tormenta viene la calma.

    Todo depende del cristal con que se mire --> Not exactly the same, but renders the same idea that the truth is in the eye of the beholder.

    I agree: ojos que no ven, corazón que no siente.

    Greetings
     
  12. Monnik

    Monnik Senior Member

    Yo, en México; mi corazón, en Madrid
    Mexico - Spanish/English

    Thanks, Soy Yo... It's a helpful link, which I will be reading -in detail - more than once, I am sure. :)
     
  13. JB

    JB Senior Member

    Santa Monica, CA, EEUU
    English (AE)
    "Every cloud has a silver lining."
     

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