Iubita si iubitu

Discussion in 'Română (Romanian)' started by mikasa_90, Jan 20, 2008.

  1. mikasa_90

    mikasa_90 Senior Member

    italia
    I want to understand that:

    Iubita means gyrlfriend and iubitu boyfriend?
     
  2. robbie_SWE

    robbie_SWE Senior Member

    Sweden
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Iubită can mean "girlfiend" and iubit can mean "boyfriend". Iubit is also an adjective meaning "loved". I personally prefer to say amor (like amorul meu), but that's just me.

    :) robbie
     
  3. mikasa_90

    mikasa_90 Senior Member

    italia
    Multumesc Robbie.
     
  4. Zamolxis Junior Member

    Belgium
    Romanian
    I thought I'd go more in details on this as it might interest others as well.

    So this would be a more complete picture: :)

    Prietenă = (female) friend or girlfriend
    Prieten = (male) friend or boyfriend
    (the meaning can be confusing, as it ranges from the most innocent friendship to very intimate relationships)

    Iubită = beloved, refering to the girlfriend
    Iubit = beloved, refering to the boyfriend

    Iubita = the beloved (girlfriend)
    Iubitul = the beloved (boyfriend) - this is sometimes (incorrectly) spelled Iubitu, hence the word in the thread title

    Iubita mea = my love, my beloved (girlfriend)
    Iubitul meu = my love, my beloved (boyfriend)

    All the above have gender forms as you can see and they also suggest that the two are not yet married.

    But we also have:

    Iubirea mea = my love - same as the above, but gender neutral and can be used after marriage as well

    Dragostea mea = my love - gender neutral, can be used to address the one you love before, but also after marriage

    Amorul meu = my love - gender neutral and can be used also after marriage like the above; only difference is that it's more classy than classic, more posh than traditional. For some it might suggest even more closeness, while for others actually a not very deep love, sometimes superficial.

    - - -

    And now less technical and more practical, if you are a foreigner wanting to seduce a Romanian (boy or girl), any of these three will sound equally romantic coming from you:
    - Amorul meu
    - Dragostea mea
    - Iubirea mea

    I would have a slight preference for one of the last two (any of them), but as you can see robbie_SWE above prefers the first. See how he/she reacts to each of them. Maybe even ask which one he/she prefers. ;)

    If you use the format Iubita mea / Iubitul meu that often implies (but not necessarily means) that your relation is already a step further than exchanging romantic messages over the net. Often suggests that you are already together, possibly in a stable relationship even. This is both romantic, but also defining the social relation between the two of you.

    Prietena mea / Prietenul meu on the other hand, mainly defines the relationship between the two. Something like "we're going out together, and maybe consider a serious relationship". It can be that the two are in a serious and/or passionate relation, but they just want to avoid emphasizing that in public. So it's not really romantic (but neither the opposite). More neutral let's say; maybe a more appropriate term to use in official situations for example.
     
  5. robbie_SWE

    robbie_SWE Senior Member

    Sweden
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Brilliantly put Zamolxis!

    Now I'm curious to know which one you prefer! ;)

    The reason why I prefer amorul meu is because Romanian phrases that deal with love are so ambivalent! Amorul meu strikes me as being "more" sincere (even if it might be a bit posh :cool:).

    :D robbie
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 21, 2010
  6. Zamolxis Junior Member

    Belgium
    Romanian
    Between "dragostea mea" and "iubirea mea"? Any. Maybe it wasn't clear in my post so I rephrased it a bit now. The difference between the two is too small to make a choice. Maybe "iubirea" would be a preferred in normal situations, though "dragostea" said with passion can sound even better sometimes.

    As far as "amorul meu" is concered, the story is a bit more complicated. We first lost the word in Romanian, with "dragoste" & "iubire" taking its place, and then it came back during the 19th century I guess, as neologism from French. Because of this, there are various perceptions of the word:

    - some find it exotic in a good way. It makes it sexy, romantic, etc.

    - some find it more specifically related to romantic love (unlike the other two, which can also refer to love for your mother, a friend, a book, your country etc)

    - some find it though exotic in a negative way. Some feel it refers to a more frivolous love (maybe due to the fact that it comes from French). Or even a more superficial love, as before it was used more by the posh people, and of course the perception among the low classes was that rich/posh people often have relations more based on money than on true love.

    Depends probably on the generation, social class and place of growing up. I am let's say a middle class guy from Bucharest, and I can say that most of my friends of the same generation (born late 70's) would rather avoid using "amorul meu" due to its mixed connotation, but would also not reject it. I'd personally use it only in private, and only as alternate to the others, for variation and because I like to call 'my love' in all possible romantic ways I can think of. ;)
     
  7. CriHart

    CriHart Senior Member

    Canada
    Romanian
    wow, robbie, you say "amorul meu"? sounds funny, but also cute.
     
  8. mikasa_90

    mikasa_90 Senior Member

    italia
    In italian is : Amore mio :) as the same with Romanian
     
  9. robbie_SWE

    robbie_SWE Senior Member

    Sweden
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    You're making me blush :eek:. I'm a real rebel when it comes to Romanian words and phrases (you should here me talk :D)!

    I prefer it because "iubita" is used by too many, "amorul meu" is kind of unique. The phrase is also recognised by most Romance-speaking people in the world, making it more intelligible.

    :) robbie
     
  10. CriHart

    CriHart Senior Member

    Canada
    Romanian

    From now on we'll be 2 to use it. Sounds very-very well :)
     

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