Jak przetłumaczyć te frazy?

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by Strzykafka, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. Strzykafka

    Strzykafka Junior Member

    Austin, TX
    Polish
    Hello i witam,

    Mam problem z przetlumaczeniem pewnych fraz, szczególnie wyrażeń/słów:
    -John zadzwonił w momencie gdy Mary wybierała/wklepywała numer.
    -Mary powiedziała John'owi na dowidzenia, że...
    -John zaczął wyrzucać/wyrzygiwać Mary wszystko na raz, aż się popłakała.


    Dzięki wielkie
     
  2. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    John called as (when) Mary was dialing the number. (wklepywał number is not really good Polish).
    Mary told John X while saying Goodbye. Mary told John that she liked the party, when saying Goodbye.
    I am not sure what you mean in the last sentence. It is not standard Polish -- especially wyrzygiwać. He told her all his complaints at once, so as to make her cry (which made her cry). Was that what you meant in the last sentence?
     
  3. Strzykafka

    Strzykafka Junior Member

    Austin, TX
    Polish
    Hey, Thanks for your response.

    I meant exactly what you did write about the last sentence. In deed, it is not standard Polish. However, complaining is not exactly what wyrzygiwać is. It means kind of the same, but what do you think about throw sth back in sb's face?

    Also, I need translation for this:
    -John i Mary szli w parku za rękę
    -John i Mary wracali do domu za rękę
    -John puścił rękę Mary
    -John odprowadzał Mary do domu za rękę

    In the sense of that they are a couple.

    THX!
     
  4. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I know it means to vomit, in slightly more vulgar way. I think you may need a separate thread for the other sentences.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
  5. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    The problem is that you mix freely up incompatible speech registers in your post - common colloquial phrases and vulgar ones. I don't know to what linguistic subculture you belong, but to most Polish speakers 'rzygać' is a strong vulgar word, almost as strong as "fuck" in English.
     
  6. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    'Rzygać' is not so much a profanity in the full sense of this word like 'fuck', rather it is an example of a very crude language and using it is indicative of one's social class.

    In any case, don't think I've ever heard anyone say "wyrzygiwać komuś coś" to mean "wygarniać coś komuś". Please, next time you may happen to start a thread try using standard colloquial Polish rather than phrases that form part of your idiolect and only you can understand.
     
  7. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I agree. I think it is stronger than f..k, and really disgusting. I would advise anybody against using it in more formal, or literary language, especially, in conversations other than the ones with your friends and family members who may use and like it.
     
  8. Strzykafka

    Strzykafka Junior Member

    Austin, TX
    Polish
    It is for a movie script, not for socializing or social conversations... Please don't judge.
    And BTW. I'm Polish and I know "wyrzygać coś komuś" is not vulgar. You wouldn't say that to your professor, but this phrase is not vulgar/curse. I lived in Poland over 20 years, I was born there. It is not proper to use that, but it expresses also emotions. In example if somebody says, "...a potem, Piotrek wyrzygał mi co się dało! Wiesz jak się czułam... To było coś okropnego." - this is totally not vulgar. Please, guys, do NOT judge.

    But, thanks for your responses.
     
  9. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    If it is so, then providing such a piece of information in your first post wouldn't go amiss, Strzykafka :) It would make things easier.


    I've never heard of "wyrzygiwać coś komuś" to mean "wygarniać cos komuś". Are you sure there exists such a phrase, or perhaps it is your and your friends' idiolect? I would take it to mean "A potem zwymiotował na mnie/koło mnie wszystkie swoje treści pokarmowe" :)

    And yeah, vulgar though it may not be (stonger than 'fuck'? give me a break...), it's really distasteful. For that reason alone I wouldn't really use it :D
     
  10. Strzykafka

    Strzykafka Junior Member

    Austin, TX
    Polish
    If you hear it in the movies, it is not only friends' idiolect. It is very common phrase in Poland. I bet if you would ask a native Polish, perhaps one of your friends between 18-35, sentence like that, "Jeżeli Ci powiem, Jaś wyrzygał Małgosi wszystko co się dało, a później dodał jej, że jest brzydka, co uważasz, że oznacza fraza 'wyrzygał wszystko' w tym zdaniu?", I bet they would say it means we are talking about.


    BTW. I still need a translation for that. I don't mean exact translation, just something which shows complain one person on another, but with stronger emotions, like, "...He preached me all night like that. And today he was wyrzygiwał me what I did wrong last year. Can you believe it?" (talk between 2 friends around 25 yo)
     
  11. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Where did you take it from? What film are we speaking of here? This is a very unusual use of words -- yes, it would be be understood, no, it's not a fixed phrase or something you'd expect to hear in this context.

    For "wygarniać coś komuś" see "bawl something out", "have a go at somebody", "make complaints".

    Just out of sheer curiosity, are you a professional audio-visual translator?
     
  12. Strzykafka

    Strzykafka Junior Member

    Austin, TX
    Polish

    I heard it in variety of films. It is not taken from a film, I need it for a film script.

    I think "bawl something out" and "have a go at somebody" are the best. Thanks!
     
  13. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    You could also say he was all over me today about when I did wrong last year.

    It has the informal tone that you may be looking for, and it's very colloquial.
     
  14. Strzykafka

    Strzykafka Junior Member

    Austin, TX
    Polish

    Thanks. That one is very good too.
     
  15. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    This might work too: He was in my face today about...
     
  16. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I'd go for NotNow's suggestion, Strzykafka -- it's the most neutural one, and given your location and that you have used the word "movie" rather than "film", it would be rather inadvisable to use 'have a go at somebody' in your script. I take it that it's intended for the American audience.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2012
  17. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I think it would be advisable if he posted it in the English Only forum, and see what speakers of AE had to say. As for the Polish vulgar expression -- I doubt it was in any movies -- even if it were, it would have been edited. :D
     
  18. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Is that to say that there is no foul language in films? :)
     
  19. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Is there, in Polish films? The last Polish film I watched was the "The Crossbearers." (about the Templars, sort of).Krzyżacy.
     
  20. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Of course, just like foul language is not unheard-of in films made in any other country, be it in the US, Germany, Italy or elsewhere. It's no wonder that there wes no such language in 'Krzyżacy', given the nature of the film :D
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2012
  21. R.O

    R.O Senior Member

    Polish
    I haven't seen the film in a few years now but I don't think they don't use crude or impolite words in it. :)
     

Share This Page