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Je vous prie d'accepter, Madame/Monsieur mes respectueuses salutations

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by Tres Lenguas, Jan 12, 2009.

  1. Tres Lenguas Junior Member

    Paris
    French
    Que dois-je mettre comme traduction pour un courrier courtois à un adulte : Je vous prie d'accepter, Madame/Monsieur mes respectueuses salutations.
     
  2. exiled scot Senior Member

    The common ending for letters in English is either "Yours faithfully" which is formal or "Yours sincerely" which is a little less formal.
     
  3. GEmatt

    GEmatt Senior Member

    La Côte, Switzerland
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    Hello there,

    It is a lot less elaborate than in French.

    Normally, for someone you don't know by name ("Dear Sir/Madam", "Dear Sir or Madam"), you would conclude with "Yours faithfully".

    Where you know the person (or, at least, are addressing him/her by name, so "Dear Mrs. White", "Dear Mr. Brown"), you would conclude with "Yours sincerely".

    I'm not sure if the distinctions are so clear-cut any more, though.
     
  4. Antipodean

    Antipodean Senior Member

    Queensland, Australia
    English (Australian)
    Tres Lenguas,

    The advice you have been given is correct for BE. GEmatt is right to point out that the distinctions are a less clear in the past. The reason is that there has been a trend in the past couple of decades to make correspondence more personalized and a lot less formal - not dissimilar to the increasing use of tu in the workplace in France. For example, I have drafted correspondence for government ministers and terminated the draft with Yours faithfully only to have the minister change it to Yours sincerely. (I can only speak for my country of course.)

    That said, GEmatt's little guide is the best I've seen; I would frame it.
     
  5. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    And in a formal letter in AE, it would usually just be Sincerely, XXX
     
  6. Antipodean

    Antipodean Senior Member

    Queensland, Australia
    English (Australian)
    That's right Wildan. As I understand it, the AE formula is the reverse of the BE one?
     
  7. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    In any event, it is good form in BE to use the person's name wherever possible.

    So, French:

    Jean Dupont
    Directeur, Ets Dupont ...
    Monsieur le Directeur, ...
    ...Je vous prie d'accepter, Monsieur le Directeur, mes respectueuses salutations.

    Would be in BE:

    John Smith
    Director, Smith & Co...
    Dear Mr Smith, ...
    Yours sincerely,

    You should only use the Dear Sir ... Yours faithfully, version if you don't know the person's name.
     
  8. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    Business correspondence in AE usually ends with a single word:
    Sincerely,
    (Handwritten signature goes here)
    John Doe
    It makes no difference whether the person is addressed by name or not.

    Yours truly, Sincerely yours, etc. would normally be used only in personal, rather formal correspondence.

    Yours faithfully, Yours in Christ, etc. are mostly used by clergy or very religious people.
     
  9. Tres Lenguas Junior Member

    Paris
    French

    And what is the difference between Your sincerely and Sincerely yours?
     
  10. alisonp Senior Member

    London
    English - UK
    The first one's BrE and the second one's AmE, I think.
     
  11. Antipodean

    Antipodean Senior Member

    Queensland, Australia
    English (Australian)
    I'm guessing here Tres Lenguas and I can only comment on BE usage. Interestingly, I can only find one example of it in "Titles and Forms of Address: A Guide to their Correct Use" (London, 1969 - admittedly a little dated) which was written for a British readership . To my mind, Sincerely yours suggests greater familiarity between the two correspondents and is a touch more personal than Yours sincerely.
     
  12. Tres Lenguas Junior Member

    Paris
    French

    Ok thanks a lot for your help!
     
  13. livvie Senior Member

    Bretagne
    Gibraltar, English
    Hello,

    I am working on a document that is a letter of information/circular from a Human Resource Department to its employees. The document finishes with this line :

    [FONT=&quot]Nous vous prions de croire, Monsieur, à l’assurance de nos salutations respectueuses.[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot] Département des Ressources Humaines[/FONT]


    Would this still be translated as 'Yours faithfully' ? Sounds a bit funny but I can see what else to put.


    Thanky
    [FONT=&quot][/FONT]
     
  14. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    What's wrong with "Yours sincerely"? I rather think that a Human Resources Department would want to sound as warm as possible.
     

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