Joshua, Jessica, Joy

Discussion in 'עברית (Hebrew)' started by fubuhawk, May 9, 2006.

  1. fubuhawk New Member

    english england
    hi there i wondered if anyone out there can help me? I wanted to get the name Joshua translated into hebrew but i dont know how to go about it. Its for a tattoo yes I know very original but hey kids are with you forever so why not. If anyone can help could you make the font nice and big incase i have to copy and paste

    Rob
     
  2. Josh_ Senior Member

    the phrontistery
    U.S., English
    Hello Rob,

    You probably want Joshua as it appears in the Bible:

    יהושע
    (Pronounced yehoshuua)

    But if you would like the modern (English) pronunciation of Joshua transliterated into Hebrew, let us know.:)
     
  3. fubuhawk New Member

    english england
    Thanks for that its truly appreciated its taken me years to get it and look at that I sign up for this site and i get it in a day. You know you said there is a modern (English) pronunciation of Joshua that can be translated . What does it look like and can the same be done for Jessica because i don't think that one has a biblical meaning?


    Rob
     
  4. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Jessica = Yiskah. I think they write it as:

    יִסְכָה
     
  5. Josh_ Senior Member

    the phrontistery
    U.S., English
    Hebrew has no 'j' sound like is found in English so a special symbol is used with the letter gimel ( ג ) to represent that sound. I do not know how to make it on the keyboard so I had to use my paint program to create it.

    Here is Joshua:

    Joshua.JPG

    The bad thing about transliterations involving languages with with different alphabets is that there can be many ways to spell foreign words. So the above spelling is just my way (not necessarily the best way). Maybe others will offer their suggestions.

    Here is Jessica (Note that that the symbol used with the ג in Joshua should also be used with Jessica, but because I don't know how to make it I left it out. If you choose to use this interpretation, just be sure to put it in, otherwise people will pronounce it guessica.)

    גסיקה

    Hebrew does not normally use vowels so the pronunciation may not be clear, so, for clarity purposes, you could also spell it:

    גיסיקה
    (This will be pronounced with long 'e' sounds like in 'keep': jeeseeca.)
     
  6. chaya Senior Member

    english (UK) French Spanish Italian
    so how would I write JOY in Hebrew?
     
  7. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    My suggestion would be ג'וי, but you should wait for the natives. :)

    By the way, Josh, the little apostrophe that has to be put next to the gimel can be found where the "w" is on a US keyboard. How do they call it, by the way? I have heard "psik", but I couldn't find anything useful about it on the Internet.
     
  8. amikama

    amikama sordomodo

    ישראל
    עברית
    Interesting, I didn't know Jessica comes from a Biblical name!
    You only omitted one tiny dot in the letter כ:

    יִסְכָּה
     
  9. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Oops, yes. :eek:

    I should have omitted all nikkuds, so I could have made the mistake to forget about the dagesh. Thanks for the corrections. :)

    I found it on the Net. A page said it came from the Biblical name "yiskah".
     
  10. amikama

    amikama sordomodo

    ישראל
    עברית
    For some odd reason, Joshua is usually transliterated as
    ג׳ושוע
    (yes, with the letter ע which doesn't exist in English).

    The symbol you mentioned is called geresh, which is very very similar to apostrophe. So use any apostrophe (on your keyboard) to represent it. And Jessica (with that geresh) is:

    ג׳סיקה

    No, yud is not usually added to represent the vowel 'e'.
     
  11. amikama

    amikama sordomodo

    ישראל
    עברית
    Good suggestion! ;)

    No, "psik" is comma... And as I've just said, the Hebrew apostrophe is called "geresh".
     
  12. Josh_ Senior Member

    the phrontistery
    U.S., English
    That's interesting. It must be because of the Biblical spelling.

    Thanks, I did not know what it was called.

    Thanks. I actually have a layout of the Hebrew keyboard taped next to my computer, so I don't know why I never noticed the geresh on the "W." I guess, since I've never used it until this thread.
     

Share This Page