1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

JUEZ DEL REGISTRO CIVIL (Acta de Matrimonio - Mexico)

Discussion in 'Legal Terminology' started by didakticos, Mar 6, 2009.

  1. didakticos

    didakticos Senior Member

    St. Petersburg, FL, USA
    Español de Costa Rica (y de otras partes también)
    Hola forer@s:

    en un Acta de Matrimonio de Michoacán, Mexico, encontré la siguiente frase:

    ... EL ACTA No XXXX LEVANTADA POR EL C. JUEZ DEL REGISTRO CIVIL...

    Mi pregunta:

    ¿debería traducir JUEZ como JUDGE? ¿O como CLERK?

    No estoy seguro y agradezco de antemano cualquier sugerencia al respecto.
     
     
  2. Aserolf

    Aserolf Senior Member

    Colorado, USA
    Spanish/Torreón☺MEX
    En México es común encontrar Juez del Registro Civil u Oficial del Registro Civil.
    Mi sugerencia es:
    Civil Registry Judge/Clerk

    Saludos;o)
     
  3. didakticos

    didakticos Senior Member

    St. Petersburg, FL, USA
    Español de Costa Rica (y de otras partes también)
    ¡Gracias Aserolf!
     
  4. David Senior Member

    I think you could just say Judge of the Civil Registry. That there is no such title in the US seems irrelevant; it is clear enough and faithful to the Mexican official's title.
     
  5. Aserolf

    Aserolf Senior Member

    Colorado, USA
    Spanish/Torreón☺MEX
    Lo que quise decir es que puede usar uno o lo otro, dependiendo de si el original dice Juez u Oficial:
    Judge of the Civil Registry
    o
    Clerk of the Civil Registry
     
  6. David Senior Member

    Dice "Juez"

    ... EL ACTA No XXXX LEVANTADA POR EL C. JUEZ DEL REGISTRO CIVIL...

    recorded by the by the C[itizen] Judge of the Civil Registry
     
  7. Aserolf

    Aserolf Senior Member

    Colorado, USA
    Spanish/Torreón☺MEX
    Esto sí lo entendí, y la otra sugerencia solo se la di como referencia, aclarando que en algunas actas viene Juez y en otras Oficial.
     
  8. xabel28 New Member

    mexican spanish
    juez del registro civil es registrar of the civil registry
    judge/ magistrate son diferentes cargos
     
  9. Iuris Tantum

    Iuris Tantum Senior Member

    Juneau
    Mexican Spanish
    Eso de que juez y magistrado son diferentes cargos es váildo.

    Sin embargo, aun y cuando su actividad es diversa a la jurisdiccional, aquellas personas encargada de asentar registros, defunciones,adopciones, etc. se llaman, por disposición de la ley, jueces.

    En algunos estados se llaman oficiales, también por disposición de la ley.

    En el Distrito Federal se llamaban jueces, luego oficiales y ahora de nuevo jueces. Pero no por capricho, sino por que así lo dispone la ley correspondiente.
     
  10. Popps Senior Member

    English
    Pero para traducir esto en el contexto del reino unido/irlanda, sería "Registrar of the Civil Registry"? Tengo razon, o no?

    Normalemente un juez es lo que está en el Juzgado (que se encarga de los crimenes, etc) y un "registrar" es lo que se encarga de los matrimonios/nacimientos.
     
  11. Sofitamor

    Sofitamor Senior Member

    Madrid Area, Spain
    Spanish - Spain and French - France
    Vamos a ver si puedo ayudar a aclarar este dilema : Let's see if I can help clear up this matter :

    (I'm a sworn translator = intérprete jurado, es decir, un traductor oficial, an official translator)

    If you are doing a translation that tries to be official, you have to be faithful to the original. Then, it doesn't matter who is doing this task in the country where the translation will be used. Hence, you have to use the word "judge", just like David said : "I think you could just say Judge of the Civil Registry. That there is no such title in the US seems irrelevant; it is clear enough and faithful to the Mexican official's title."

    But if you are making a translation for other purposes, and you're not trying to be faithful, then, you may "localize" the original and change this. Though I do not recommend doing this. Especially in these type of documents.

    If you translate "estaba viendo el partido de fútbol en la tele" for, let's say, an australian audience where this sport is not widely followed, would you change that sport and put a popular sport in Australia, in order to find a sort of equivalent ? I wouldn't. Certainly NOT in a legal text.

    David is right, as usual. Trust him. He's very, very, very good. (Hi, David) :)
     
  12. Sofitamor

    Sofitamor Senior Member

    Madrid Area, Spain
    Spanish - Spain and French - France
    Let me give you another example to make my point :

    If the text says "comían tortillas muy felices", would you translate this into "they ate cheeseburguers merrily" just because your readers in Irland / US / elsewhere don't eat tortillas ? Just because tortillas is not a local food ? But if you are doing "localization", then yes, you need to change the text and adapt it to local readers.

    In this kind of legal text, it is unlikely that you are doing localization. You are probably doing regular, plain, good old-time translation. Then, you should use "judge".

    If you want, you may add this : "Note by the translator : In Irland / Uk / wherever, this task is performed by a registrar." But really, it is not necessary and I don't advise this kind of note. Professional translators try to avoid unnecessary notes. This job of translating is not about showing people how much you know, but just about trying to explain something in another language, that's all. I hope my ideas can be useful. :)
     
  13. Hulalessar Senior Member

    Andalucía
    English - England
    I think that Sofitamor makes some excellent points. When faced with the task of translating a legal text one needs to ask, having regard to the nature of the text, for whom the translation is intended and for what purpose it is needed. Legal texts present special problems because they involve concepts, institutions and roles which differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction (even of course between jurisdictions using the same language). The difficult is especially acute when translating a text produced under one system for someone used to an entirely different system. A text produced in Scotland may need to be interpreted for an English lawyer if he wants to know what its effect is.
     
  14. Sofitamor

    Sofitamor Senior Member

    Madrid Area, Spain
    Spanish - Spain and French - France
    Thanks, I agree. Law fascinates me more and more, though I read Poli Science, not Law. But after years and years of using Law in my work & private life, I find that I love it. A very complex world, its explanation is in history. Have a great week-end !
     

Share This Page