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Kite (flying object)

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by rusita preciosa, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    How do you say kite in your language (please provide literal translation when applicable)

    Russian: воздушный змей [vozdushnyi zmey] - air snake/serpent
    French: cerf-volant - flying elk/deer
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2009
  2. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In Portugal the most general way to say kite is papagaio de papel, "paper parrot". There are also some regional terms.
     
  3. Awwal12 Senior Member

    Moscow, the RF
    Russian
    Well, I believe, "air serpent" would be a better translation.
     
  4. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek:
    Χαρταετός
    xartaetos, m.
    lit. paper-eagle
    [x] is a voiceless velar fricative, a hard ch
     
  5. HUMBERT0

    HUMBERT0 Senior Member

    In Spanish from Mexico it's “papalote”. I believe it comes from the Nahuatl word for butterfly.

    I think elsewhere in the Spanish speaking world it’s “cometa”, not sure though.

    :)
     
  6. SDLX Master

    SDLX Master Senior Member

    Lima, Peru
    Spanish - Peru
    Yes, it is "cometa" which comes from the English word "comet" because it resembles its tail.
     
  7. Awwal12 Senior Member

    Moscow, the RF
    Russian
    Hm... That's offtopic, but I always thought that this word comes from Ancient Greek "κομήτης" ("kometes" -> hairy, shaggy). And I seriously doubt that this word came into Spanish through the English language.
     
  8. jazyk Senior Member

    Brno, Česká republika
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Yes, hundreds of them in Portuguese. The ones I'm more used to are pipa and papagaio.
     
  9. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2009
  10. la_machy

    la_machy Senior Member

    Hermosillo, Sonora, México.
    Español de Sonora
    In Sonora we do say 'papalote'.

    Saludos
     
  11. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    In Hungarian: papírsárkány (papír = paper, sárkány = dragon)
     
  12. ungatomalo Senior Member

    Spain's Spanish
    Also spanish: cachirulo
    And catalan/valencian: catxirulo; to fly a kite: empinar el catxirulo
     
  13. amikama

    amikama sordomodo

    ישראל
    עברית
    Hebrew:

    עפיפון (afifon) - derived from the root ע-ו-פ related with flying.
     
  14. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch: simply vlieger (flyer).

    In my Flemish dialect: draak (dragon), as in Hungarian...
    In some others: waaier (it does what the winds does and what things do as a result of the wind [not really blow])
     
  15. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    Finnish: leija
     
  16. Favara Senior Member

    Catalan - Southern Val.
    A more standard word would be estel, and in some areas in País Valencià we say milotxa.
     
  17. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Fine, but what do the words mean literally (in Catalan, Finnish, ...) ?
     
  18. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    :thumbsup:
    Added!
     
  19. Favara Senior Member

    Catalan - Southern Val.
    I'm not sure about the etimology for the other Catalan words, but estel also means "star" (shooting star = estel fugaç).
    I think catxirulo comes from Aragonese, meaning a square piece of cloth worn in the head by men.
    I'm not sure about milotxa but I read it might be related to miloca, meaning a small owl or eagle-like bird.
     
  20. JVTorres New Member

    Southern California
    Mexican Spanish
    I may have posted my previous question in the wrong forum.

    My apologies....
     
  21. Mahaodeh Senior Member

    Arabic and English
    In Arabic during the late Middle Ages (prior to the acutal invention of airplanes): طيّارة = Tayyaara = flyer. However, in most collequal dialects this term is used nowadays for airplane (in standard Arabic it is Taa'ira) so in modern days it's called Tayyaara waraqiyya = paper flyer, to avoid ambiguity.
     
  22. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    How do you write tayyaara waraqiyya in the beautiful Arabic script?
     
  23. Awwal12 Senior Member

    Moscow, the RF
    Russian
    rusita preciosa, it's طيّارة ورقية
    :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2009
  24. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    Thank you!! :cool:!
     
  25. Agró

    Agró Senior Member

    High Navarre
    Spanish-Navarre
    In Iberian Spanish we say "cometa", a word which comes from Greek through Latin, not English:
    cometa.
    (Del lat. comēta, y este del gr. κομήτης, de κόμη, cabellera).
     
  26. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    But what is a cabellera ???
     
  27. Agró

    Agró Senior Member

    High Navarre
    Spanish-Navarre
    cabellera.
    (De cabello).
    1. f. El pelo de la cabeza, especialmente el largo y tendido sobre la espalda.
    2. f. Pelo postizo, peluca.
    3. f. Ráfaga luminosa de que aparece rodeado el cometa crinito.
     
  28. Ushuaia

    Ushuaia Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    castellano rioplatense
    Well doubted! :)

    The word we use here is barrilete.
     
  29. la_machy

    la_machy Senior Member

    Hermosillo, Sonora, México.
    Español de Sonora
    ¡Qué linda palabra es barrilete, Ushuaia!

    Gracias por compartirla. :)


    Saludos
     
  30. Ushuaia

    Ushuaia Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    castellano rioplatense
    ¡Gracias, m.!

    Por acá me pasan otra, de nuestro litoral (Entre Ríos, Corrientes, Misiones): pandorga. Hablando de palabras musicales... ;)
     
  31. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    My Spanish is not that good: pandorga (speaking of musical terms referring to musical terms ?) - and the cabello (hair of the head lying on the back ????), the barrilete (little barrel ???). Help !
     
  32. ungatomalo Senior Member

    Spain's Spanish
  33. Nizo Senior Member

    There are two words for this object in Esperanto:

    kajto (from the English "kite")
    flugdrako ("flying dragon")
     
  34. ilocas2 Senior Member

    Bohemia
    Czech
    Czech:

    drak (dragon)
     
  35. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Turkish:
    uçurtma : the thing that is for getting flown (by someone)
     
  36. mataripis Senior Member

    Tagalog: SARANG-GOLA but i heard the other term is "Guryon".
     
  37. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    Thank you mataripis, but as you have been asked repeatedly, could you please provide literal translation (if it exists). Since the majority on this forum does not speak Tagalog, your posts do not contribute anything without translation.
     
  38. tFighterPilot Senior Member

    Israel - Hebrew
    Hebrew: עפיפון 'afifon. Comes from the word עף 'af which means "[he] flies"
     
  39. AutumnOwl

    AutumnOwl Senior Member

    Sweden
    Swedish - Sweden, Finnish
    I'm not sure of the meaning of the word leija, but it could come from leijailla which means to soar or to float.

    Swedish:
    Drake
    - dragon
     
  40. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    "kite" in Turkish (written as kaydı) means "it slid (on water or ice or wet place)", "it glided (in the air)" .

    Maybe a relationship with "kayak" ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kayak. (it's kayık in Turkish)
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2012
  41. Konanen

    Konanen Junior Member

    Germany, Stuttgart
    Turkish; German
    In German, we say: Drachen [dragon]
     
  42. anipo Senior Member

    Israel
    Spanish (Arg)- German
  43. mataripis Senior Member

    Sarang gola sounds " Sa ilang gala" meaning "the one that move around the atmosphere".
     
  44. Montesacro Senior Member

    Roma
    Italiano
    Italian:

    aquilone ("big eagle")
     
  45. kusurija

    kusurija Senior Member

    Lithuania, K. city
    Lithuania Czech
  46. OneStroke Senior Member

    Hong Kong, China
    Chinese - Cantonese (HK)
    Chinese:
    風箏/风筝 (fēngzhēng) is by far the most common word. Fēng means 'wind'. I'm not sure what zhēng originally meant, but nowadays, the character is only used in 風箏 and 古箏/古筝 (a Chinese plucked-string instrument).
    紙鷂 (zhǐyào) is a much rarer word for 'kite' and it means 'paper sparrowhawk'.
     
  47. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    Japanese 凧 (tako)

    I don't know the etymology of this word, or if it has anything to do with tako (蛸) meaning "octopus".
     
  48. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    The variety of names makes we wonder whether a kite could have had some specific meaning of use in cultures...
     
  49. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Just a guess. But could it be related with Turkic "takı" from "tak" meaning "something made up of smaller pieces fixed~assembled together" ? We fix smaller clothes and woods together to make a bigger cloth~kite.
     
  50. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    I haven't read the literature on the possible relationship of Japanese and Turkic. However, I just learned that Japanese has many other regionally-specific terms for "kite", such as

    ika ("squid")
    furyu ("windstream")
    hata ("flag" / "pennant")
    taka ("hawk")
    tombi ("kite (bird species)")
    yozu ("high-flying object")

    The presence of the word for "squid" in this list, along with other animal species, suggests that the "octopus" meaning of tako predates the "kite" meaning.
     

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