Kolay gelsin

Discussion in 'Türkçe (Turkish)' started by Edguoglitigin, Sep 27, 2012.

  1. Edguoglitigin

    Edguoglitigin Senior Member

    Ankara
    Turkish
    "Kolay gelsin" is the most frequently used phrase in Turkish that it's very functional and meaningful. It's used when we see anybody working on something especially on difficult jobs or matters. For a native speaker of Turkish, it's needed to say this in English at times but then you cannot find any ideal phrase (or I dont know that's why I am posting this thread). So what are you offers for this Turkish phrase?
     
  2. Rallino Moderatoúrkos

    Ankara
    Turkish
    You might want to see this thread.
     
  3. Guner

    Guner Senior Member

    Australia
    Turkish
    That thread Rallino pointed out was pretty good. Additionaly in Australia, we say "Have a good one!" for a number of things which can also include to wish someone a good day and a smooth way to finish whatever they are upto. In a formal way you can also say "Godspeed!" which means may God grant you success (speed: from old English sped). So for a very casual wish I'd use "Have a good one" but for anything more serious like say you are going on a 100km charity ride I'd use "Godspeed and Goodluck !"
     
  4. shawnee

    shawnee Senior Member

    Melbourne
    English - Australian
    My interest in kolay gelsin was prompted by the fact that it is used in Greek as κολάι (as a loan of course), where to do something with κολάι is to do something with ease. So I had thought that the Turkish usage might also be limited to the act of doing something, which might in turn limit its English interpretation to; 'more wind to your sails, more grease to your elbow and such like.
     
  5. Guner

    Guner Senior Member

    Australia
    Turkish
    Ditto..but imagine yourself saying 'more wind to your sails !' to a public servant or a rubbish bin collector in Aus :) He might even find it offensive !...that is if he can understand what you are saying in the first place...
     
  6. shawnee

    shawnee Senior Member

    Melbourne
    English - Australian
    Ha! Good point kardasim Guner. So I conclude that kolay gelsin has a wider application than any one english equivalent, which depends much more on context.
     

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