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La herida supura pus y con el tiempo deberá cicatrizar

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Gamen, Apr 21, 2013.

  1. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Buenas tardes.
    Según encontré en el diccionario de WR, "supurar" se dice "to fester". ¿Es correcto como sinónimo "menos técnico" emplear el verbo "to give off" o "to expel"(despedir)?
    Creo que el verbo "cicatrizar" no existe en inglés por eso en la oración de abajo traduje ese verbo español como "to form a scar" o "to heal". ¿Es correcto?

    Doy un ejemplo:
    La herida está infectada y supura/despide/expulsa un liquido amarillento llamado pus. Con el tiempo, la herida deberá cicatrizar
    The wound is infected and is festering / giving off / expelling a yellow liquid called pus. With the time, the wound will form a scar / will heal.

    Muchas gracias.
     
  2. Benzene

    Benzene Senior Member

    GENOA (ITALY)
    Italian, Italy
    ¡Hola Gamen!

    Mi sugerencia es como sigue:

    "the wound is infected and forms a yellowish liquid called pus. The wound will heal with the passing of time."

    EDIT: "cicatrizar" = "to cicatrize, to heal, to close, to skin over".

    ¡Saludos!

    Benzene
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2013
  3. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Buenos días.
    Gracias por la respuesta.

    Me suena muy informal usar "cicatrize", no?

    Nunca escuché "skin over", es utilizado?

    Con respecto al uso de "to fester", "give off" y "expel" (liquids the organism), "to form a scar" puede decirse que son correctos?
     
  4. mijoch Senior Member

    British English
    The wound weeps pus, and with time, should heal.
     
  5. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    I would add "...into a scar"
     
  6. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Nobody would use "to fester" (suopurar) on one hand, and "to expel" or "give off" (despedir) on the other?
     
  7. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    fester and suppurate are OK.
     
  8. aloofsocialite

    aloofsocialite modrageous!

    San Francisco / Oakland, CA
    English - USA (California)
    Fester is a great word. It's not a word everyone will know the precise meaning of, but most understand the context. We wouldn't normally say "The wound festers pus" but rather "the wound is festering/is beginning to fester," "pus" is already implied in the process of festering.

    Suppurate on the other hand is a word not in the common vocabulary and I would venture that, aside from those in the medical field, most would only understand it possibly by the context.

    And no, we don't use the verb "to skin over". "To cicatrize" is a nice verb, but again, most wouldn't understand it.

    EDIT: Mijoch's suggestion sounds most natural to me.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
  9. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Thank you aloofsocialite.
    In Spanish "supurar" is rather common and it does not sound exclusively as a word from the medical language.
    Regarding "cicatrize", I think it is very little used in English and technical as "suppurate, right?

    How do you say "despedir un líquido", just "to weep"?
     
  10. aloofsocialite

    aloofsocialite modrageous!

    San Francisco / Oakland, CA
    English - USA (California)
    Yes, I do believe that's the case. Though honestly, even amongst medical professionals, unless it were in a formal medical text, most would probably say "weep pus" instead of "suppurate". They would just be able to recognize it's meaning where a layman might be lost. I'm going to say the same is probably true with "to cicatrize", it would be used in a medical text, or possibly even in a poetic context, but not in the day-to-day use of the common doctor.

    And yes, "despedir un líquido" is effectively "to weep."

    Fester is a good medical term, but also has a poetic overtone to it.
     
  11. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Perfect aloof.
    There are differences between the two languages, that's why I sometimes use in English formal words, similar in form to the Spanish ones, that are not really common among you, but they are for us.
    In Spanish it is very common to say in everyday talk or with the doctor "la herida me está cicatrizando", what's more, we don't have any other word to say "cicatrizar". According to what I've seen through this thead you would use rather "to heal" and even "to form a scar", right?
     
  12. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Lo siento pero en español, ¿no es "supurar" intransitivo? ¿No sería como en inglés "suppurate", que se utiliza así, sin "pus" después, ya que es redundante:
    "supurar: 1. intr. Formar o echar pus."
    (definición aquí)
     
  13. aloofsocialite

    aloofsocialite modrageous!

    San Francisco / Oakland, CA
    English - USA (California)
    Yes, that's right. "To heal" is probably the most common and generically used, when a wound scars or forms a scar, it's the result of a very particular kind of wound, since not all wounds leave visible scars.
     
  14. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Yo creo que se pueden supurar otros líquidos que no sean pus como "fibrina", por eso no me parece redundante decir "supurar pus". De hecho, decimos "supurar pus" y rara vez usamos el verbo como intransitivo. No soy experto, pero por lo menos en el habla cotidiana se aclara cuál es el el líquido que supura.
    ¿En inglés sólo se usa "supurar" para referirse a la expulsión de "pus"?
     
  15. aloofsocialite

    aloofsocialite modrageous!

    San Francisco / Oakland, CA
    English - USA (California)
    Me parece que ha sido una pregunta para DearPrudence, pero que yo sepa, en inglés "to suppurate" es una palabra limitada al pus, pero como no ejerzo la medicina, no lo puedo aseverar con rotundidad.

    Fuente

    Suppuration

    The process of pus formation, called suppuration, occurs when the agent that provoked the inflammation is difficult to eliminate. Pus is a viscous liquid that consists mostly of dead and dying neutrophils and bacteria, cellular debris, and fluid leaked from blood vessels. The most common cause of suppuration is infection with the pyogenic (pus-producing) bacteria, such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus.
     
  16. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Estuve buscando en diccionarios de la web y la definición principal de "supurar" en español es "segregar o secretar pus", como indicó DearPrudence. No obstante, en el habla cotidiana se usa "supurar" en un sentido más extenso. Posiblemente el significado de supurar se haya ampliado en el habla coloquial.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
  17. aloofsocialite

    aloofsocialite modrageous!

    San Francisco / Oakland, CA
    English - USA (California)
    De acuerdo Gamen. :)
     
  18. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Very clear.
    I didn't know the verb "to scar" would exist, but it must be "to form a scar" more common", right?
     
  19. aloofsocialite

    aloofsocialite modrageous!

    San Francisco / Oakland, CA
    English - USA (California)
    Yes, both exist and you're right in that "to form a scar" may be more common, although both are usual. "To scar" also has the meaning of traumar which "to form a scar" does not, which is why I should have perhaps more properly said "to scar over."

    The wound has scarred over.
    The wound has formed a scar.
    The wound has scarred. (This intransitive use is possible, but less common here.)
     
  20. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Thank you!
    Regarding "skin over" do you use it? It was suggested in the first posts, but I've never heard of it.
     
  21. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Could "the wound healed into a scar" be said?
     
  22. aloofsocialite

    aloofsocialite modrageous!

    San Francisco / Oakland, CA
    English - USA (California)
    "To skin over"? Never heard of it. Although it makes sense. It's not used here to my knowledge.
     
  23. aloofsocialite

    aloofsocialite modrageous!

    San Francisco / Oakland, CA
    English - USA (California)
    Absolutely chileno. That sounds great.
     
  24. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Ah, thank you. I thought I was crazy.
     
  25. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Thank you very much aloofsocialite. All your explanations has been of great help!
     
  26. aloofsocialite

    aloofsocialite modrageous!

    San Francisco / Oakland, CA
    English - USA (California)
    You're very welcome Gamen. Glad to help out.
     
  27. mijoch Senior Member

    British English
    How strange it is to me to supply a standard form in English ·"to weep pus" and see this ignored until another English speaker (hi there aloof) joins in.

    "weeps pus" googles.

    I suppose the message for me is to stay off the hispano threads because they all know more English than I. Maybe so.
     
  28. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Not at all. Please don't take it hard.

    I am sure that I've heard more than one American say "it's oozing", and it wasn't offered...These are suggestions only. I am not in a competition of who knows more, and I am speaking for myself.
     

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