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  1. mstevens Junior Member

    france french
    hello!
    comment peut-on traduire "lardons" en anglais? ceux que l'on trouve dans une pizza ou une quiche par exemple. j'ai trouvé "thinly sliced bacon" mais ça me semble inexact. merci à tous
     
  2. Old Novice

    Old Novice Senior Member

    Massachusetts
    USA, English
    L'expression plus près est "bacon bits", je crois, mais lardons sont un peu plus grands (et de meilleur goût!).
     
  3. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    I'd probably just use pieces of bacon, although there might be a better word for it. Pieces of may be unnecessary, depending on the sentence - please provide the complete sentence.

    My first thought was bacon bits, but those are smaller, and the term often implies the prepackaged ones sold as a salad ingredient. You can find examples of that in a web search.
     
  4. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    Selon la version anglaise du Larousse Gastronomique, a lardoon consiste d'un lambeau de lard: "a strip of larding fat of varying lengths and thicknesses, threaded into meat, poultry and game by means of a larding needle. In French, the name lardon (lardoon) is also used of coarsely or finely diced bacon etc."(ce que vous savez déjà).
    Les chefs de cuisine en Angleterre ainsi que leurs apprentis ont la tendance d'employer les termes culinaires français sans les traduire et même si leur prononciation est atroce et qu'ils disent par example pettitt poyze pour petits pois. Lardoons je n'ai jamais entendu avant, to lard et lardons, si.
     
  5. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    I have looked for "lardons" in England, having eaten several dishes using this meat in France. Unfortunately, I have never come across anything like it over here, and when I consult butchers etc. they have never heard of the like.

    I don't think we have a word for it, to be honest.
     
  6. mstevens Junior Member

    france french
    merci à tous, bits of bacon devrait convenir car il s'agit d'un des ingrédients d'une salade composée. j'avais pensé aussi à small cubes of bacon... Qu'en pensez-vous? Cheers!
     
  7. williamc Senior Member

    england english
    Strips of bacon used to grease a pan or dish.
     
  8. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    Moderator note: Your new question has been moved here: gésiers
    Please ask only one question per thread.
     
  9. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    The English "Larousse Gastronomique" is well written and contains, as I have said above, the English word lardoons, which has very likely gone out of general use now and been replaced by the original French lardon in haute cuisine. It is a well-trained British chef, not a butcher who would know about this. Even the cuts of meat are vastly different in the two countries (and in the States).
     
  10. Gourmay Senior Member

    London/Paris
    US/FR English and French are BOTH my mother tongues
    It's called pancetta here :)
     
  11. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    It's called pancetta here Gourmay (a most excellent alias for pronouncing on matters gastronomical)

    By here, I suppose you mean stateside. The word you cite is Italian in origin and defined as 1. bacon and 2. potbelly (the latter referring to the girth of an obese person). In the (Iberian) Spanish-dubbed version of "The Simpsons", Homer is often salivating over something he calls panceta (the Spaniards don't like double consonants), which would appear to be streaky bacon and is defined by our on-site dictionary as such (when cured) and pork belly (when fresh). I don't know what has been translated from the original American version, but very likely your pancetta (presumably pronounced pan-tshe-ta).
    Incidentally, Sancho Panza, Don Quijote's overweight squire, derives his name from the same root (cognate of French la panse).
     
  12. Gourmay Senior Member

    London/Paris
    US/FR English and French are BOTH my mother tongues
    Bizzarely, the edit I added on to my post didn't come up so I'll start again. I was hunting for 'lardons' to make a carbonara sauce a little while ago and the most similar thing they sell here is called pancetta (albeit it's a little thicker but pretty much the same thing). That being said, it's very true that in other places pancetta might refer more specifically to that type of meat in its uncut form.

    I've heard people say little pieces of lard as well but that just doesn't sound as nice...
     
  13. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    Lard in England is not bacon at all but pork belly fat rendered down and left to solidify into a white substance. It is sold in brick-shaped lumps wrapped up in grease-proof paper like butter or margarine and used as cooking fat (or at least it used to be before the obesity/cholesterol scare). The French word le lard is a faux ami really denoting a kind of bacon. However, the French have borrowed our word bacon (n.m.) to indicate the English type which is cured in various different ways and has a different appearance, and no doubt also for the tourists not content with bread, jam and coffee for le petit déjeuner who are seeking le breakfast anglais and would be put off if they were offered "lard". (For Americans in Paris there is advertised in English ham 'n eggs in which the meat turns out to be the same as le bacon). So "little pieces of lard" will not do here at all.
     
  14. lela105 Senior Member

    Ohio
    US/English
    If you're translating this for an American, I would advise not using "bacon bits". American bacon is a lot different than what we translate as "bacon" from French. This "bacon" is actually called "Canadian bacon" here.
    I actually had "lardons" on pizza in France, and I think the closest equivalent here would be diced ham, especially if you're talking about a salad recipe, since "diced ham" actually is sometimes used in salads.
     
  15. konungursvia Senior Member

    Toronto
    Canada (English)
    Bacon bits are usually hard and dry as well as small, whereas lardons are bigger, juicier and fatter. I agree with diced pork fat, diced ham or diced bacon as possible solutions.
     
  16. Gourmay Senior Member

    London/Paris
    US/FR English and French are BOTH my mother tongues
    Thanks for the wikipedia or whatever entry but I am well aware of what 'lard' means. I never said it would do, just that some people do actually use it to mean lardons, probably as a diminutive. Oh and just so you know when talking about lardons, it is perfectly acceptable in France to say 'du Lard'. As in, 'j'ai cuisine un plat avec des patates, du fromage et du lard/des morceaux de lards'.
     
  17. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    My dear Gourmay,
    If you re-read my message, even though it was probably not really worth reading the first time, you may see that I am actually in agreement with you and realised that you too were rejecting the use of "little pieces of lard", and also that I agree that lard means bacon in French. My apologies for seeming overbearingly didactic as well as ,apparently, obscure, and for my attempt at humour which has obviously gone awry.
    Salut, A.:)
     
  18. Gourmay Senior Member

    London/Paris
    US/FR English and French are BOTH my mother tongues
    No worries, it's hard to understand someone's tone of voice on an internet forum so apologies from this side as well if I didn't really get it ;)

    Wow, this thread has made me hungry!
     

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