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  1. baz259 Senior Member

    english england
    hi, can you help me with this word and exsplain it's use.
    thanks.
    barry
     
  2. XrisSM

    XrisSM New Member

    Español (España)
    "leismo" is to use badly the word "le" or "les". Some people use "le" when they must use "lo" or "la".

    with "it", you must use "lo"
    with "he", you can use "lo" or "le"
    with "she", you must use "la"

    Examples:
    Yo vi el camión = Yo lo vi :tick:
    = Yo le vi :cross: [wrong]
    Yo encontré a Maria en el parque = Yo la encontré en el parque :tick:
    = Yo le encontré en el parque :cross: [wrong]
    Yo encontré a Juan en el parque = Yo lo encontré en el parque :tick:
    = Yo le encontré en el parque :tick:




    ----

    Se denomina leísmo al fenómeno de utilizar los pronombres átonos "le" y "les" cuando lo correcto sería "lo" y "los" o "la" y "las".​
     
  3. Talant

    Talant Senior Member

    Hi,

    "leismo" is a common mistake in Spanish. First I will make an introduction:

    "Lo/la" are pronouns used to substitute the Direct Object (¿? Objeto Directo) of the sentence: "Juan catches the dog" "Juan atrapa al perro" "Juan LO atrapa"

    "Le" is used to substitute the Indirect Object (¿? Objeto Indirecto)
    "Juan gives it to Sarah" "Juan da eso a Sarah", "Juan LE da eso"

    "leísmo" is when you use "le" instead of "lo" or "la". Most often with "lo".

    There is also "laísmo" (using "la" instead of "le") and, less often "loísmo".

    Leísmo has become really common, so the Real Academia now just recommend to use "le".

    Hope it helps
     
  4. mhp Senior Member

    American English
  5. María Madrid

    María Madrid Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Spanish Spain
  6. baz259 Senior Member

    english england
    thank you.
    barry
     
  7. Pliscapoivre

    Pliscapoivre Senior Member

    Deutschland
    English, US
    Hi everyone,

    Is this correct? I was very surprised to read that:

    with "it", you must use "lo"
    with "he", you can use "lo" or "le"
    with "she", you must use "la"

    Examples:
    Yo vi el camión = Yo lo vi :tick:
    = Yo le vi :cross: [wrong]
    Yo encontré a Maria en el parque = Yo la encontré en el parque :tick:
    = Yo le encontré en el parque :cross: [wrong]
    Yo encontré a Juan en el parque = Yo lo encontré en el parque :tick:
    = Yo le encontré en el parque :tick:


    ***

    It seems to contradict what I have heard and read. Can anyone clarify? I think that "le" is correct in the example:

    Yo encontré a Maria en el parque = Yo la encontré en el parque :tick:
    = Yo le encontré en el parque :cross: [wrong]

    Gracias de antemano,

    Pliscapoivre​
     
  8. lazarus1907 Senior Member

    Lincoln, England
    Spanish, Spain
    "Encontrar" is a transitive verb, and the person or thing that you encounter it is a direct object, i.e. lo, la, los or las.

    Exceptionally, "le" can be used instead, but only in instead of "lo" (for male singular). This is common in Spain, but it is not recommended.​
     
  9. Pedro P. Calvo Morcillo

    Pedro P. Calvo Morcillo Senior Member

    Madrid
    España, español.

    Hello Pliscapoivre:

    "Le" is not correct in the example, :cross:[Yo] Le encontré en el parque, if María is whom you have found in the park. María is the direct object so that you must use la for this femenine referent. If you had found Juan in the Park you would have said: [Yo] Lo encontré en el parque. In this case you may also say: [Yo] Le encontré en el parque, since le is accepted instead of lo when the referent is a male.

    Regards,

    Pedro.​
     
  10. Pliscapoivre

    Pliscapoivre Senior Member

    Deutschland
    English, US
    Gracias a todos.

    I suppose my mistake was in thinking that if there was an "a" (i.e. encontre *a* alguien), then the verb was intransitive. Somehow I got it into my head that one used "le" for people and "lo" or "la" for inanimate objects. So "la" is always used for feminine objects, whether human or not, if the verb takes a direct object. If it's a feminine *indirect* object, then it would be "le," correct?

    Thanks again...

    Plisca
     
  11. IDiedInSpain

    IDiedInSpain Junior Member

    Texas
    United States - English
    You are correct.

    Veo el libro -> Lo veo
    Veo a Benito -> Lo veo
    Veo a ella -> La veo
    Veo a ella -> Le veo = leísmo
     
  12. Pedro P. Calvo Morcillo

    Pedro P. Calvo Morcillo Senior Member

    Madrid
    España, español.
    Veo las estrellas. I see the stars.
    Veo a Juan. I see John.
    Both, las estrellas & a Juan, are direct objects. Preposition a precedes Juan because Juan is a human referent.
    Here, we are using le referred to a car:

    Tengo que cambiarle el aceite al coche/carro.
    I have to change the oil in may car.

    :thumbsup:. Otherwise, you would commit laísmo.

    Regards,

    Pedro.
     
  13. Pedro P. Calvo Morcillo

    Pedro P. Calvo Morcillo Senior Member

    Madrid
    España, español.
    Hello:

    While it is an eloquent example, nevertheless we must remeber that: "veo a ella" is not correct Spanish.

    Regards,

    Pedro.
     
  14. Foxy Lady New Member

    Florida
    English USA
    I'm still confused and learning the proper use of these pronouns. Thanks for all the good information.
    Foxy
     
  15. Cosaco Senior Member

    Castellano

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