le rompo su mandarina en gajos

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Dr. Who, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. Dr. Who

    Dr. Who Junior Member

    North Carolina, USA
    English (US), Spanish (Mexican-American)
    I'm having trouble with 3 phrases. The context is a dialogue in a courtroom where a Mexican guy is accused of assault and battery against his wife.


    1) "Siempre cuando mi ruca me responde, le rompo su mandarina en gajos."

    I get the first part ("Whenever my old lady talks back to me..."), but not exactly sure about the second part. I'm assuming "le rompo su mandarina" is something like "I bash her head in"? No clue about the "gajos," unless it's related to "peGAJOSo" (as in, he beats her head in 'til it's sticky with blood or something?)

    ¡Gracias! :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2009
  2. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Gajos are the sections that make up a Mandarine orange. I break her orange into sections.
    I don't know the phrase but it sounds something like "tear her limb from limb". Something unpleasant, at any event.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2009
  3. 7rojo Junior Member

    Mexico
    Mexican Spanish
    Hey, Dr. Who!
    Guess this is too late for a reply.
    "Romper la MAnDaRina en gajos" comes from "romper la MADRe", mexican expression for beating up someone. As you can imagine, it is not a nice expression since literally it means BEAT UP YOUR MOTHER, and that's why they changed it to mandarina taking into account the similarity between them. This turned out to be pretty funny, considering that a mandarin can be teared apart into its own segments.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2009
  4. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Welcome, 7rojo! :) And many thanks for the explanation. ¡Genial! :D
     
  5. Dr. Who

    Dr. Who Junior Member

    North Carolina, USA
    English (US), Spanish (Mexican-American)
    !Gracias, 7rojos! What a great explanation! Aunque no me sirvio' para clase, me sirve para la pro'xima.
     
  6. MHCKA

    MHCKA Senior Member

    CIUDAD DE MÉXICO
    MÉXICO. ESPAÑOL
    Paso 1, la frase traducida al español:

    Cada vez que mi mujer/esposa me contesta, la golpeo.

    Paso 2, romper la mandarina en gajos si proviene de romper la madre, el uso ofensivo que le damos en nuestro país asociado a la progenitora de nuestro rival significa normalmente golpear a alguien con la intención de matarlo. A pesar de esto tiene una razón técnica (o médica) de ser, se refiere a la duramadre, la cual es la más fibrosa y dura de las tres capas que forman sistema junto con la aracnoides y la pia madre, cuya función es la protección física del cerebro y del sistema nervioso central, específicamente del encéfalo y la médula espinal; si nos la rompen, si nos andan matando.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2009
  7. 7rojo Junior Member

    Mexico
    Mexican Spanish
    ¡Guau!
    Tú sí te fuiste al fondo del asunto.
    Excelente contribución, muchas gracias
     
  8. VTP Senior Member

    México, D.F.
    Mexican Spanish
    Very often, people who use the word "madre" in that context, don't have a clue of what the "duramadre" is, let alone use the word in their daily language.

    The term "madre", as we are using it here, has a range of meanings, and seldom refers to someone's mother. It can aslo refer to someone's face. Or, in a more general sense, to a person's physical integrity. For instance: "Se cayó y se partió la m....", which is a way to say: "He fell and got badly injured".


    And in some parts of the country, the term "ruca" doesn't always mean an "old lady". It is a synonim for "vieja". Although "vieja" do means "old lady", this word is used to refer to a woman, in spite of her age. It is a deeply-rooted custom in México. Many men will call their wife "mi vieja", and thus, the word becomes a synonim for "woman".

    Mi ruca = mi vieja = mi mujer (even is she is pretty young)

    ñ_ñ
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2009
  9. Juan Jacob Vilalta

    Juan Jacob Vilalta Senior Member

    México
    Español/Francés
    Excelentes explicaciones de los compatriotas.
    El mexicano es MUY dado a NO emplear la palabra ofensiva, sino una parecida.
    Mandarina por madre es ejemplo clarísimo.
    A chiflar a su Máuser = A chingar a su madre.
    A Wilson = A huevo.
    Me pica la coliflower = me pica la cola
    Y un larguísimo etcétera.
     
  10. Txiri

    Txiri Senior Member

    USA English
    Muy interesante!
     
  11. MHCKA

    MHCKA Senior Member

    CIUDAD DE MÉXICO
    MÉXICO. ESPAÑOL
    Tendemos al eufemismo...ha de ser cultural.

    Para completar eso de la madre: madrina en vez de madriza, es decir, romperle la madre a alguien.
     

Share This Page