leave the window opened

Discussion in 'English Only' started by quietdandelion, Sep 25, 2007.

  1. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Are you going to leave the window opened?
    Are you going to have your window opened?
    Are you going to leave your window open?



    I think only the first sentense doesn't make sense; the other two sound right and good. Your comments, please.
     
  2. tepatria Senior Member

    Onondaga, Ontario
    Canadian English
    I agree with you. The first sentence does not sound as natural as the others, though there are times it could be used. The room is freezing cold and your wife is sitting comfortably watching television. You could ask #1, though I prefer open, not opened. Don't forget the question mark at the end of each sentence.
     
  3. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    I'm surprised that the first sentense could be right. Well, it's considered to be wrong here. We regard the third one as being right. Could you spare me a few words as for the reasons why the first one is right? Thanks again.
     
  4. tepatria Senior Member

    Onondaga, Ontario
    Canadian English
    I have rattled my brain and taken another look. I think the first one must be used with open, not opened. Open describes the state of the window, while opened is a verb, so it shouldn't be used here. You really have me thinking very hard this early in the morning. Isn't it your bedtime?:D
     
  5. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    I think one could say all three, Quiet One, but in different circumstances:

    Are you going to leave the window opened? suggests that you've had work done on the house and a window embrasure has been opened. Are you going to leave the window opened?, or are you going to put in glass, have it boarded up, or have it glazed? In this sense window means the embrasure, and we are talking of building work.

    Are you going to have your window opened? suggests, of course, that you can't do it yourself. Someone is talking to a sick person or a cripple - someone incapable of opening a window, or perhaps we may be talking building work again and it means are you having that bricked up window opened (and turned back into a window, perhaps).

    Are you going to leave your window open? is the normal way of asking if you are not going to close it.
     
  6. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, tepatria, for the confirmation.
    Yes, it's about our bedtime here.
     
  7. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, Thomas.
    You're really knowledgeable to come up with the above rare and precious example. Nevertheless, it's an exception, right? Do native speakers often use the first sentence?
     
  8. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    I said it would only be appropriate in the context of building works. But people would say it in that context, I think.

    In other circumstances I can't imagine its being used.
     

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