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legislations? plural of legislation

Discussion in 'English Only' started by apoziopeza, May 15, 2012.

  1. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    Hi,

    Please help, can I say legislations?

    thanks,

    A.



    … rights stipulated by both European and respective national legislations – can we use plural here?
    Iwould like to say European legislation a respective national legislation [=two different legislations]

    -------------------
    … rights stipulated by both European legislation and respective national legislation - could this be a solution?
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2012
  2. DocPenfro

    DocPenfro Senior Member

    Little England
    English - British
    "This is based on those countries' national legislations" (source: British National Corpus)

    At least you can claim there are precedents for this usage, although personally I would try to avoid it, as you have done with "by both European legislation and respective national legislation"
     
  3. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    thank you very much for the precedent :)
     
  4. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Perhaps it depends on what "legislation" means. I take it to be the law-making process, which is an abstraction and unlikely to have a plural.

    Some people (influenced by French ????) use it to mean either the law or the legislative body (e.g. Parliament) in which case it can obviously have a plural. The example you give above seems to be of that type. Personally, to avoid vagueness and ambiguity, I would avoid this usage in any case; if you mean laws, say laws. If you mean legislatures, say legislatures.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2012
  5. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    and which article should be used correct here?

    rights stipulated by both European legislation and a respective national legislation
    rights stipulated by both European legislation and the respective national legislation
    rights stipulated by both European legislation and [zero article] respective national legislation
     
  6. DocPenfro

    DocPenfro Senior Member

    Little England
    English - British
    Any one of these would work, but my personal order of preference would be: the; zero; a. Naturally I would defer to the formidable intellect of KB in this matter.
     
  7. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    None of them, for the reason I stated in #4. Wrong vocabulary.

    I think what you mean is "rights stipulated by both European law and the respective national law". But I'm guessing.
     
  8. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    and when you want to say [...?] respective national law of any/each country within EU? [not a specific country]
     
  9. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    If it's not a specific country, use any - that's its basic meaning.

    Each means all of them, considered one at a time.
     
  10. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    can I summarize this as follows - here we do not use "a" or "zero article" only "any" and "the" -

    rights stipulated by both European legislation and any respective national legislation [any country, not particular country, one of the countries concerned]
    rights stipulated by both European legislation and the respective national legislation [one specific country]
     
  11. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    That's right. But re-read #4 and #7.
     
  12. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    thank you very much
     
  13. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    rights stipulated by both European legislation and the respective national legislation [one specific country] = rights stipulated by both national and European legislation

    NB National legislation does not stretch beyond the borders of a nation and so "national legislation" covers your intended, "the respective national legislation [one specific country]"
     
  14. bluetoba New Member

    Indonesian
    What about this, which one is right and why?

    There is legislation on .....
    OR
    There is a legislation on .....
     
  15. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    In American English, legislation is always uncountable so only your first option would be correct.
     

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