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Let me know and expressions with the same meaning

Discussion in 'English Only' started by cherry3024, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. cherry3024 Junior Member

    Belgium
    Chinese
    Hi,there

    Is "let me know" a polite expression of "tell me" and is it polite enough? In what context "let me konw" is used? Is there any expression with the same meaning of "let me konw"?

    Thank you very much.

    P.S. I am new here as an English beginner and desire to learn English well. Hope everyone to give me a hand and correct me. Thank you in advance.:)
     
  2. Nunty

    Nunty Modified

    Jerusalem
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Welcome to the forums, Cherry. :)

    Is it polite enough? We don't know without knowing the situation. How would you like to use it?
     
  3. cherry3024 Junior Member

    Belgium
    Chinese
    Thank you for your kind replying,Nunty. For example, I chat with a professor, who is my teacher's teacher. I want to say "If you want something from China, please feel free to let me know", is it OK?

    And generally I would like to know other expressions with the same meaning.

    Thank you again.:)
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2010
  4. Nunty

    Nunty Modified

    Jerusalem
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    It really depends on what it is you want to know, and the sentence you would like to use it in.

    Please let me know if I can help with the project.
    Could you please tell me when the next lab will be?
     
  5. cherry3024 Junior Member

    Belgium
    Chinese
    Thank you for your quick reply, Nunty. I realise that the situation is not clear after I have replied you and I edit it immediately. Does it make more sense this time? Maybe you can give me more advice.:)
     
  6. Nunty

    Nunty Modified

    Jerusalem
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    "If you want something from China, please feel free to let me know"

    is perfect. :)
     
  7. boss24 Junior Member

    bangla
    Dear , If question is "What you want to know ?" And answer is " what you let me know?" is okay ?
     
  8. rhitagawr

    rhitagawr Senior Member

    British English
    Let me know doesn't (usually) mean Tell me.
    Let me know (usually?) refers to a piece of information about the future. The implication is that the other person doesn't know yet.
    1)Let me know what you decide (when you've made your decision).
    2)Let me know the time of the train (when you find out).
    3)Let me know the results of the experiment.
    4)If he rings, let me know.
    Tell me can refer to the present and past.
    5)Tell me about yourself.
    6)How can I help you if you won't tell me what's wrong?
    7)Tell me what happened on the night of the burglary. Let me know what happened... would imply that the other person needed to go and find out what had happened.
    There's a degree of overlap. I suppose you could say If he rings, tell me. I wouldn't say that the one was more polite than the other. Let me know is a little more colloquial.
     
  9. boss24 Junior Member

    bangla
    If question is "What you want to know ?" And answer is " what you tell me ?" is okay ?
     
  10. rhitagawr

    rhitagawr Senior Member

    British English
    I'm afraid I don't understand this, boss24. Do you mean If the question is "What do you want to know"?
    "What you tell me"
    isn't really a sensible answer to the question. I'd expect an answer such as I want to know who you are or I want to know the time of the next train to Gloucester or I want to know the price of those apples etc. You could say Could you tell me who you are, please? Depending on your tone of voice, this would be more polite than I want to know who you are.
     
  11. boss24 Junior Member

    bangla
    dear rhitgawr , " I want to know exactly what do you want to tell me. "- okay ?
     
  12. rhitagawr

    rhitagawr Senior Member

    British English
    Not really. I want to know exactly what you want to tell me is OK. The second part of the sentence is really reported speech, so it isn't in question form.
    "What do you want to tell me?" -> I asked him what he wanted to tell me.
    "How old are you, Kay?" -> I asked Kay how old she was.
    "What were you doing last night? Don't answer that. I know exactly what you were doing last night."
     
  13. boss24 Junior Member

    bangla
    thanks rhitagawr
     

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