Let or hindrance

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Schrodinger's_Cat, Jan 8, 2009.

  1. Schrodinger's_Cat

    Schrodinger's_Cat Senior Member

    New Jersey, USA
    American English
    Let or hindrance‏ is usually used in the form without let or hindrance, meaning, without impediment, something that is free to progress.

    To let is to allow something happen.

    Hindrance = intralcio, ostruzione, ostacolo

    How do you say in Italian without let or hindrance?
     
  2. Rob625

    Rob625 Senior Member

    Murlo (SI)
    English - England
    But 'let' in 'let or hindrance' has nothing to do with 'let' = 'allow'. Let is an old word that means, roughly, hindrance. It's now only found in the phrase 'let or hindrance'.

    I doubt very much that Italian has an oddity to match.
     
  3. Schrodinger's_Cat

    Schrodinger's_Cat Senior Member

    New Jersey, USA
    American English
    Well, if you make a search at Phrases, sayings and idioms at The Phrase Finder

    you'll find

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 8, 2009
  4. Skin Senior Member

    Italian
    Non è letterale, ma un'espressione italiana dal significato simile che mi viene in mente è "liscio come l'olio".

    "Al matrimonio di mia cugina tutto filò/andò liscio come l'olio!"

    L'espressione ha un registro piuttosto colloquiale.
    Ciao
     
  5. prowlerxpla Senior Member

    Passo Genovese
    Italy Italian
    Senza intralci o impedimenti, I think is quite widely used and understood.
     

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