l'exercice à trous

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by big_pete, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. big_pete Junior Member

    Melbourne, Australia
    English (Australia), Finnish (Fluent)
    Bonsoir tout le monde,

    Je suis en train d'essayer comprendre cette partie de la phrase suivante. Vous pouvez m'aider?

    "Avant d'écouter le texte, vous pouvez imprimer le PDF et faire l'exercice à trous."

    Est-ce que ça veut dire 'oral/verbal exercise'?

    Merci d'avance.
     
  2. livvie Senior Member

    Bretagne
    Gibraltar, English
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2009
  3. big_pete Junior Member

    Melbourne, Australia
    English (Australia), Finnish (Fluent)
    Merci :)

    Mais il y a encore une question. Que veut dire "EIT" qui tu as mis dans la derniere poste?
     
  4. livvie Senior Member

    Bretagne
    Gibraltar, English
    LOL

    Thank should have read EDIT sorry. Nice to see you paying attention!
     
  5. big_pete Junior Member

    Melbourne, Australia
    English (Australia), Finnish (Fluent)
    haha..
    that explains it!
     
  6. Novanas Senior Member

    English AE/Ireland
    I'm adding a note to this thread just to complicate matters a bit. In a novel I'm reading, a woman was given an "exercice à trous" to do, and in the context I'd say it was almost certainly a Cloze test she was given.

    A Cloze test is of course a type of "fill-in-the-blanks" exercise, but it is a specific type of exercise, and I believe that in English we always specify a Cloze test if that's what it's a question of. We never refer to a Cloze test as a "fill-in-the-blanks".

    Having done some googling, I find that a Cloze test in French is "un Cloze test", though I did find a reference to "un exercice Cloze". However, it appears to me that French speakers sometimes refer to "un Cloze test" loosely as a "texte/exercice à trous". If I'm mistaken about this, perhaps someone will correct me on it.
     

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