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Licenza Media, Diploma di Maturità

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Dru, Apr 9, 2006.

  1. Dru Junior Member

    Italy, Tuscany
    Swedish, Sweden
    Hello!
    Does anybody know what means Licenza Media and Diploma di Maturita? What education level is it? Licenza Media means that I've finished high-school?? Or Diploma di Maturita means that? Hopefully someone find the time to answer me! Mille grazie :)
     
  2. DanyD

    DanyD Senior Member

    Padova
    Italiano, Italy
    There have been a school reform recently, so things may be different now but till a few years ago this was the Italian school system:

    6-10 -> 5 years "Scuola Elementare"
    11-13 -> 3 years "Scuola Media"
    14-18 -> 5 years "Scuola Superiore" ->High School

    When you finished "Scuola Media" you had to sit an exam: if you passed it you had "Licenza Media"; after High School you had to sit "Esame di Maturità" and you gained "Diploma di Maturità" (now it's called "Esame di Stato").

    Hope it helps!
     
  3. TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    Piccole correzioni al tuo ottimo inglese, DanyD! In AE we would say "sit for an exam" or more commonly "take an exam". I'm not sure whether BE usage is to "sit an exam" or "sit for" it.

    "Hope it helps" is grammatically correct, but "Hope that helps" is more natural sounding in AE. :)

    Saluti!
    Elisabetta
     
  4. Dru Junior Member

    Italy, Tuscany
    Swedish, Sweden
    Grazie per tutto! It has been a great help! :)

    Can't wait to come back to Italy again!
     
  5. DanyD

    DanyD Senior Member

    Padova
    Italiano, Italy
    Thank you very much Elisabetta!
     
  6. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    In Australia we generally say sit for an exam or sit an exam. I can't remember hearing anyone say, take an exam, although it would obviously be understood.
     
  7. lsp

    lsp Senior Member

    NY
    US, English
    It seems to me that "take an exam/test" is used in lower grades, while "sit for an exam" is used in more advanced educational levels. Is that your impression as well?
     
  8. TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    I've never used the expression "sit for an exam" in my life, including my full-day doctoral comprehensive exams. Maybe it's a midwest thing to keep "taking" exams forever! ;) In BE, is "sit for" used when speaking of advanced educational levels rather than the lower grades?

    Elisabetta
     
  9. plabrocca Senior Member

    New York State, USA
    English, US
    Ciao,

    In the US we take exams. Only exchange students sit for them.

    Pat
     
  10. Manuel_M Senior Member

    Malta
    Maltese
    In BE it's sit for an exam, as far as I'm aware.
     
  11. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    Well, I took the Bar exam and I also took all my law school exams here in New York. I understand "sit for", but it sounds very English to me.
     
  12. DanyD

    DanyD Senior Member

    Padova
    Italiano, Italy
    In this site of the University of Cambridge I've found sit an exam...

    I guess now a BE speaker is needed to solve the enigma! :)
     
  13. moodywop Banned

    Southern Italy
    Italian - Italy
    Secondo il Cambridge Dictionary: sit an exam(mainly UK), sit for an exam(Australian Eng). Ma sono sicuro che si usi sit for anche in BE.
     
  14. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    According to this link:

    In the UK, a student is said to "sit" or "take" an exam, while in the U.S., a student "takes" an exam. The expression "he sits for" an exam also arises in British English, but only rarely in American English; American lawyers-to-be "sit for" their bar exams, and American master's and doctoral students may "sit for" their comprehensive exams, but in nearly all other instances, Americans "take" their exams.
     
  15. DanyD

    DanyD Senior Member

    Padova
    Italiano, Italy
    Thank you all! It's always interesting to see the differences between British, Australian and American English!
     
  16. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    This is not accurate. We take the bar (at least here on the East Coast).
     
  17. rdromana Junior Member

    Bergamo - Italy
    italian
    OK, I read it all. But does anyone know how you say "licenza media" in English?
    I have to write it in a translation of a schoo-report.
    Thanks
     
  18. liaska New Member

    italiano, Italia

    hi,
    i think if u write " junior high school certificate" (per la licenza media) and "high school certificate" (per il diploma) they can be the best solution. But, i have a question now, cause when i translated my Cv from italian to english i asked help to an italian/english friend, who translated it with word "diploma"...so now, which is the best choise between certificate or diploma?

    i hope to have been of some help.
    regards.
     
  19. pat79 Senior Member

    ITALIAN
     
  20. nattieuk Junior Member

    Italy
    english
    Having taught English for quite a few years you can sit/take or do exams and basically it is all the same, just depends on which English speaking country you live in.
    Just thought I'd mention that.
    :)
     
  21. aryk New Member

    england english
    I'm English but went to school in italy and completed my diploma di licenza media and am currently trying to find out what the english equivalent is!!?? it's hard here in england you take your G.C.S.E's at age 16 and you can leave school or stay on and do your A levels over 2 years to gain access to uni. so does that mean that the diploma di licenza media are the english GCSE's?? oh and you sit an exam!
     
  22. pat79 Senior Member

    ITALIAN
    Hello I grew up and graduated in Italy but I've been living in London for 3 years.
    I would say that the Italian school system and the English one are completely different so it's difficult to find equivalents. Personally, I don't think GCSE can be compared to Scuola Media for the simple fact that after Scuola Media you need to attend other 5 years of school before getting access at the university; while after GCSE you have to attend 2 years only before the uni.
    Anyway if you read above, the other guys have answered exhaustively to the question:

    6-10 -> 5 years "Scuola Elementare"
    11-13 -> 3 years "Scuola Media"
    14-18 -> 5 years "Scuola Superiore" -

    When you finished "Scuola Media" you had to sit an exam: if you passed it you had "Licenza Media"; after High School you had to sit "Esame di Maturità" and you gained "Diploma di Maturità".
    ;) what do you think? do you agree?
     

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