like the duop dego [doo-wop dago] you are

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by sibellium, Apr 24, 2009.

  1. sibellium New Member

    italy italian
    Gran Torino (2008), Walt Kowaski (Clint Eastwood) to Barber Martin "You are just hanging around like the duop dego you are"
    Thanks
    Francesco
     
  2. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    ¿Hay una pregunta aquí?
     
  3. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    Bueno yo tengo parte de tu respuesta:
    dego= highly offensive racial slur for an Italian. Comes from "Diego"
    Pero,estamos hablando de los tiempos de "CLint Eastwwod" asi es que hace muchos años atrás no tan era ofensivo el llamarse nombres o usar sobrenombres.

    :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2009
  4. sibellium New Member

    italy italian
    Sorry, I was asking the meaning of the sentence.
    Thanks
    Francesco
     
  5. Dlyons

    Dlyons Senior Member

    Dublin
    English - Ireland

    No offence intended Francesco ---
    What I think it means is a person of Italian extraction (dego) who
    defecates in his pants (duop).

    [Edit "doo wop" as posted below seems much more likely than Jamaican slang
    duop = "do up"
    http://books.google.ie/books?id=_lm...4KHqCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4
    Pity really - it seemed quite colorful.]
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2009
  6. sibellium New Member

    italy italian
    I got the meaning of dego as diego. (the barber is italian) Thanks or muchas gratias.
    Ciao
    Francesco
     
  7. sibellium New Member

    italy italian
    duop as pants! Thanks, it was difficult, ma very interesting the slang in the film.
    Grazie
    Francesco
     
  8. jinti

    jinti Senior Member

    I agree that dego (dago is how I've seen it) is a slur for an Italian. I would mention, though, that even during Clint Eastwood's time, it was offensive. Then, just like now, slurs that were fighting words between strangers or less-than-friends could be affectionate banter between good friends. The whole point of including it (and other slurs) in the dialogue is it clarifies and demonstrates the friendly relationship between the characters. It does NOT mean that it wasn't an offensive word back then. (My Italian-American father will back me up on that. ;) )

    Duop I take to mean doo-wop, the style of music so many Italian-Americans singers from that time were associated with (think Dion and the Belmonts, the Capris, etc.) Doo-wop was more than music; it was a style. And in this case, it puns by layering the word wop on top of dago -- wop is another ethnic slur meaning Italian, although the fact that it's part of doo-wop is just coincidence.
     
  9. jannr Senior Member

    English-United States
    jinti is correct on all counts. Duop is doo-wop, the non-word that the backup singers sang in 1950s pop songs. And dego was and is a derrogatory term for Italian, but as jinti points out, all kinds of slurs can be used within the in-group as terms of solidarity.
    jannr
     
  10. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    Well I have an article from a magazine that says the same that I though in those times words were just words:
    .
    :)

    My Grandfather is Italian also his last name is Barletta from Sicily and he also agree, that times has change.
     
  11. jinti

    jinti Senior Member

    I'm not sure where your quote is from, but there was certainly plenty of prejudice towards various ethnic groups in Eastwood's time, and Italians were on the receiving end of a good deal of it. I repeat, to regard terms like the one we're discussing here as unoffensive is to miss the point of including them in the dialogue in the movie: that these characters have the sort of friendly intimacy that allows this kind of banter.
     
  12. aurilla Senior Member

    Puerto Rico
    Am Eng/PR Spanish
    That's correct! :)
     

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