Lo que no fue en tu año no te hace daño.

Tema en 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' comenzado por Fantita, 14 de Julio de 2009.

  1. Fantita New Member

    English - USA
    Lo que no fue en tu año no te hace daño.
    Any good suggestions on how to translate this idiom?
     
    Última modificación por un moderador: 13 de Enero de 2015
  2. Carolina509

    Carolina509 Senior Member

    Illinois
    English-USA
    Is it possibly related to the a similar idiom in English?
    What you don't know can't hurt you?
     
    Última modificación por un moderador: 13 de Enero de 2015
  3. Mephistofeles

    Mephistofeles Senior Member

    Mexico
    Mexican Spanish
    I don't know if ther's an equivalent in English, but the idea is as it follows: You musn't feel afected for something which you were involved with but now you aren't anymore.
    A very simple example: If you had a boyfried but you have already ended, you shouldn't give importance if now he is with another person. Sorry, I have problems to explain my ideas sometimes... I wait for better suggestions.
     
    Última modificación por un moderador: 13 de Enero de 2015
  4. Fantita New Member

    English - USA
    Thank you Mephistofeles. It fits the context of what I read. I wish I knew how to say it in English too.I 'm thinking maybe the "none of your business".
     
  5. Solbrillante Senior Member

    USA-English
    ¡Hola! I came across this post and I ,also, would like to understand the exact sentiment behind this expression. Would it only apply to the relationship type situation that Mephistofeles gave as an example? Would it be used in a situation when someone is asking about your past and you feel it is really none of their business? I'm hoping someone might be able to clarify it's meaning just a little bit more. Muchas gracias, Sol
     
  6. Mephistofeles

    Mephistofeles Senior Member

    Mexico
    Mexican Spanish
    Not exactly, it is not like say "None of your business!" Actually it can in general apply to situations where something is "none of your business any more". i.e.

    You were playing for a football team for a time, and years after you leave, the directive committee decide to change the name of the team and decrease the salary of the player to the half. If you get angry for that, some friend will tell you "lo que no fue en tu año, no te hace daño".

    Hope it helps.
     
  7. Solbrillante Senior Member

    USA-English
    Yes, Mephistofeles! Your explanation helped me to better understand the expression. Gracias, Sol
     
  8. david314

    david314 Senior Member

    Clayton, Missouri
    American English
    Perhaps something like: It's not your problem anymore.
     
  9. Solbrillante Senior Member

    USA-English
    Or, maybe: It no longer concerns you...
     
  10. david314

    david314 Senior Member

    Clayton, Missouri
    American English
    Could I talk you into: You're out of it!
     
  11. JannahJannah New Member

    Spanish
    This phrase is used in reference to love relations specially even though it can be used in other aspects. Say you had a bf/gf and whatever they did with other people before being with you, should not concern you, so it mostly refers to the past not future as some of you suggested. Hope it helps.
     
  12. david314

    david314 Senior Member

    Clayton, Missouri
    American English
    In light of the above explanation, perhaps we could say: That's ancient history. / What you don't know won't hurt you. / That's (all) water under the bridge.


    Welcome to the forum J.J., we're all very excited about our future together! :)
     
    Última modificación: 5 de Enero de 2015
  13. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    The first and third ones are good, but I think your first suggestion (post #8) is the best of all.

    Ex.
    -I heard that your old girlfriend Jane has become a crack addict and is living on skid row now.
    -Oh, man, that's terrible!
    -Well, it's not your problem anymore.

    Of course, it all depends on the exact context.
     

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