lo smuoveva, lo rimuoveva, gli urlava nelle orecchie di alzarsi

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Sharpe, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. Sharpe New Member

    ITALIANO
    Come tradurreste la seguente frase?

    Di tanto in tanto, pur temendo il suo carattere furioso, sua moglie Maria, una santa donna, andava audacemente a chiamarlo; lo smuoveva, lo rimuoveva, gli urlava nelle orecchie di alzarsi, di sbrigarsi, ma lui niente, si girava dall’altra parte e continuava a russare.

    Io ho tradotto così:


    From time to time, even though she was really afraid of his angry mood, his wife Mary, a holy woman, went boldly to awake him. She budged him, shook him, screamed in his ears to get up and hurry, but he did nothing and continued to sleep and to snore.

    Tradurreste diversamente? Cambiereste qualcosa?
    Saluti
    Sharpe
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013
  2. fitter.happier

    fitter.happier Senior Member

    Naples, Italy
    Italian
    Stai parlando di un'azione abituale nel passato, quindi direi che would calza a pennello. Se usi il simple past suggerisci che l'azione di svegliarlo è accaduta una sola volta.

    From time to time [...] she would boldy wake him up. She would budge him, shake him, yell in his ears [...]

    Inoltre non tradurrei "una santa donna" con "a holy woman". Qui santa ha il significato di paziente, quindi cercherei soluzioni alternative.
    My two cents!
     
  3. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    We say "a sainted woman" - it has a slightly humorous sense, meaning, unbelievably patient, kind, good, etc. which I think is OK in this context.
     
  4. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    I agree with the use of "would" and "sainted woman" is great;).

    What I don't like is the verb to budge in this context, Sharpe. You budge (you move) but you can't budge someone else (or at least you can't in BE.:)).

    Jo, She would jolt and shake him....?
     
  5. Sharpe New Member

    ITALIANO
    Thanks to "fitte.happier", joanvillafane and "London calling".
    Sharpe
     
  6. fitter.happier

    fitter.happier Senior Member

    Naples, Italy
    Italian
    What about 'I couldn't budge him an inch' (as in I couldn't make him change his mind)?
    I guess you can only budge someone figuratively then... :rolleyes:
     
  7. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Hi - sorry for the delay - Yes, Jo, I was not happy with "budge" either -
    You can use it literally, too, fitter. For example, we could say: She gave him a hard shove, but she didn't budge him an inch.
    In this case, though, budge does not seem right. She pushed him/shook him/nudged him, etc. all would be better alternatives
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013
  8. theartichoke Senior Member

    English -- Canada
    Would you use "a sainted woman" for someone still alive? To me, it's got the ring of death about it: "he often spoke of his sainted mother" would imply that the good woman was no longer with us. I think I'd call someone who's still alive a "saintly woman," or perhaps better and more informal, "a saint of a woman." If the Italian "una santa donna" has particular connotations of patience, as fitter.happier suggests, one could even say "his wife Maria, a woman with the patience of a saint" or "his wife Maria, who had the patience of a saint." "The patience of a saint" is a colloquial English expression, too.

    I'd also say that she "yelled/shouted in his ear to hurry up and get up" rather than "screamed in his ears to get up and hurry." Apart from the idiomatic ear/ears thing, I suspect she wants him to get out of bed in a hurry, not to get out of bed and then start hurrying.
     
  9. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Jo, I like "nudge" instead of "budge".:)

    Re. sainted woman, theartichoke.;) I'd never heard the expression before (I would also have said someone has the patience of a saint), but I like it here because it's short and sweet. And I'm sure Jo wouldn't have suggested it if you can't use it to describe someone who's still alive.;)

    I agree with your comment about getting up and hurrying, by the way.:)
     
  10. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Well, it's definitely not an expression of high frequency, but, yes, I have heard "sainted mother" and "sainted wife" referred to people who are still living. How his sainted wife puts up with his nonsense, I'll never know. Etc.
    A good topic for English Only. When I'm more awake, I might post there. :)
     
  11. Sharpe New Member

    ITALIANO
    Dear theartichoke,
    I think that your suggestions are more suited to the inner sense of the sentences. So, thanks for joining the Thread.
    Sharpe
     
  12. theartichoke Senior Member

    English -- Canada
    You're welcome!:)
     

Share This Page