long ~ boring

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by Gavril, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    I know of at least three cases where a word meaning “boring”, or a related term, seems to be based on a word meaning “long”:



    • Slovenian dolgočasen “boring”, < dolg “long” + čas "time"
    • Finnish pitkästyä ”to become bored” < pitkä ”long"
    • In British English slang, if I understand correctly, the word long seems to be developing a general meaning of ”boring”

    Do you know of any other cases of this semantic development?
     
  2. AutumnOwl

    AutumnOwl Senior Member

    Sweden
    Swedish - Sweden, Finnish
    The most common Swedish word used to mean boring is långtråkig, lång = lång, tråkig also means boring, dull, leaden, but it can also be used to mean sad, sorry (en tråkig nyhet = sad news).
     
  3. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch:
    - langdradig, long-thready, implies that the thread has been stretched or something, so that is boring...
    - vervelend (boring): refers to 'veel', many, not to 'long'

    I cannot find other examples now, but the link with 'long' is interesting, would be more interesting if there were an etymological link between the different words (the Slovenian is only a compound). There is something I think of, but it is not the same as boring: langzaam, slow, contains lang, long. It meant long-lasting originally...
     
  4. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch:
    - langdradig, long-thready, implies that the thread has been stretched or something, so that is boring... (That reminded me of 'lengthy', which in second instance means 'tediously long')
    - vervelend (boring): refers to 'veel', many, not to 'long'

    I cannot find other examples now, but the link with 'long' is interesting, would be more interesting if there were an etymological link between the different words (the Slovenian is only a compound). There is something I think of, but it is not the same as boring: langzaam, slow, contains lang, long. It meant long-lasting originally...

    BTW: Dutch traag seeems to refer to 'slow' and originally/ etymologically also to 'sad'...
     
  5. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Can it mean "long-winded" too?
     
  6. bibax Senior Member

    Czech
    Czech:

    boring: nudný derived from the verb nuditi = to bore;

    There are also adjectives zdlouhavý (lengthy, long-winded) and expressive sáhodlouhý (fathom-long) that imply boredom.
     
  7. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch: not 'long-winded', I'd say it just refers to slow, but it need not be negative, whereas 'traag', the alternative for 'slow', seems to mean: not fast (just like slow food, yet, we even use 'trage vragen' for slow (existential) questions...
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2013
  8. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    Not in Greek. The verb we use is «βαριέμαι» [var'ʝeme] < Byz. «βαριοῦμαι» barioûmæ < Classical v. «βαρέομαι/βαροῦμαι» băréŏmæ (uncontracted) / băroûmæ (contracted) --> to resent, which is directly associated with the neut. noun «βάρος» bắrŏs --> heavy weight (PIE *gʷrh₂-u-, heavy).
     
  9. AutumnOwl

    AutumnOwl Senior Member

    Sweden
    Swedish - Sweden, Finnish
    Swedish have both långtrådig - lång-thready, as a tread stretched lång and långtradig - (from lång = long + tradig = boring, tiresome) meaning boring, verbiage, usually about speakers and writers who are boring
     
  10. Holger2014 Senior Member

    German
    German "langweilig" = "boring"
    lang = long
    Weile = (a) while
    -ig = adjective ending

    German "Langeweile" = "Boredom"
     

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