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Loose, loosen/ release

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by ThomasK, May 15, 2013.

  1. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    'Liberation' reminded me of 'release', which is based on the French root 'laisser', whereas I thought it had to do with 'loose', detached, etc. So could you give the equivalent of 'loose', detached, and 'to loosen', in your language? Can you use them in other, less literal ways?

    Dutch:
    - los, lossen
    - verlossen:
    to release people, also to save or release in a theological sense
    - losmaken: to detach
    - loslaten: to let go (to make [sure that something is] loose)

    It is also linked with '-less', with 'to lose', even with the Greek '-lysis', etc.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2013
  2. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek:

    To loose: «Λύνω» ['lino] < Classical v. «λύω» lúō (PIE *lh₁u-, to cut off, release; cf Skt लून (lUna), destroyed, cut off; Lat. luere, to pay, make amends).
    Loosen:
    1/ «Λυμένος, -νη, -νο» [li'menos] (masc.), [li'meni] (fem.), [li'meno] (neut.) < Classical perf. tense mediopassive participle «λελυμένος, -νη, -νον» lĕlŭménŏs (masc.), lĕlŭménē (fem.), lĕlŭménŏn (neut.) --> been loosen, resolved.
    2/ «Χαλαρός, -ρή, -ρό» [xala'ros] (masc.), [xala'ri] (fem.), [xala'ro] (neut.) < Classical v. «χαλάω/χαλῶ» kʰăláō (uncontracted) / kʰălô (contracted) --> to relax, loosen, in MG also to ruin (with obscure etumology) + productive suffix for adjectives «-ρός» -rós.
    To let go/release: «Απολύω» [apo'lio] (in MG also to sack, fire) < Classical v. «ἀπολύω» ăpŏlúō --> to set free, release, let go («ἀπὸ» apò --> from, away from (PIE *h₂epo, cognate with Eng. of/off) + v. «λύω» lúō)
     
  3. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    hebrew:
    loose is such a gentle word, one that does not entirely exist in hebrew,

    loose - משוחרר meshukhrqar (state of loose - thing is loose).
    detach - לנתק lenatek
    to loosen - לשחרר

    לשחרר can be to free/liberate but note that loose is not. it can also be to let go (mostly of emotions when telling to a person, but can also be of physical things, like letting the dog loose)
     
  4. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    That is an interesting note: a gentle word... I would not consider it that way. With us it is something like separate, apart, detached...
    How do you translate in Hebrew and Arabic: 'loose items', 'apart from' ?
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2013
  5. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    context is needed in that case, if its took apart from then it would be ניתק niteq, if its apart from X then its חוץ מ khuts me/mi (except for).
     
  6. aruniyan Senior Member

    Tamil
    Tamil :
    Detach : kalatri(remove from) vidu(leave), kalatru/kalainthu - remove from.
    Loose : Kalakkam (not grouped together tightly)

    Kala/கள with root meaning of gain from its place.


    Loss : izha (Em nanbanai izhanthEn) I lost my friend.
     
  7. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    So no link between losing and loosening, is there, in Tamil? Is the accident aspect the key difference ?

    I guess there are no kalakkam exercises, exercises that are not integrated into a larger whole, or are there? Can kalakkam be the result of detaching?

    As for kaka/... : how should I understand 'gain from its place'? I am interested, but don't really grasp what you suggest... [Thanks in advance]
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2013
  8. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Tamil:
    So no link between losing and loosening, is there, in Tamil? Is the accident aspect the key difference ?

    I guess there are no kalakkam exercises, exercises that are not integrated into a larger whole, or are there? Can kalakkam be the result of detaching?

    As for kaka/... : how should I understand 'gain from its place'? I am interested, but don't really grasp what you suggest... [Thanks in advance]

    Hebrew:
    Interesting link with apart from, exceptions, etc.. We don't have words based on los/ loose for that, they are not etymologically linked with them...
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2013
  9. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    I reviewed what i wrote and am not pleased with how i explained it,
    1)took apart from (or detach, took away,separated, etc) is ניתק niteq.
    2)apart from (or except for) is חוץ מ khuts me/mi - me/mi is the same but depends on the next sound we make we use a certain one (to "ease" the speech).
    there is no link between the two.

    loose items as well is needed in context, it can denote a 1)state(items are loose) or 2)verb (loose the items), so:
    1) חפצים רפויים khafatsim refuyim
    2) הרפה איקס harpe x[=something, items is just not working without a whole sentence]

    loose ends is קצוות פתוחים ktzavot ptukhim, where katze (the single of ktzavot) is end,edge,extremity and a few more.
     
  10. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    The longer I learn about different translations of words, the less I believe in universal concepts, whereas I really thought 'loose' as such would have been some kind of universal concept... ;-(
     
  11. aruniyan Senior Member

    Tamil
    Yes I dont see any link between Izha(lost) and Kalakkam(loosely fit)

    for kalatru(to loosen, to detach) (I am thinking about IE clutch, clasp etc may be some distant relation)

    some Tamil words that will be interesting for you.

    Kalai : Weed (to remove from the place)
    Kalvan : Thief
    Kalainthu : To remove (the dress, aborting)
     
  12. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    interestingly in hebrew כלה kala is end, or finish (things), while קלט kalat is used for "understood the given information" or received.
     
  13. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Turkish:

    release: sal (some words related with this root are: salıncak (a swing), salın (to dawdle, to sway), salınım (cycle, oscilation))

    loosen: gevşet
    loose: gevşek

    gevşet seems to be related with Proto-Turkic "*gē(j)t-" meaning "to go away"... And also "*gēŋ" meaning "wide, widen, expand"
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2013
  14. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Tamil: your additions are quite interesting, thanks.

    Hebrew: would be quite interested to hear if there could be links between Hebrew and Tamil in some way...

    Turkish: I suppose releasing only refers to people. Could you mention some (three) things that can be gevşek in Turkish?
     
  15. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    I dont know, nor how to find info about it, but i did find this: http://www.churchsw.org/tamil-and-the-prediluvians dont know how much reliable it is though.
     
  16. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Releasing can also be used for animals or other things. For example releasing a caged bird.... You can even say: "adam saldı" which means: "the man farted" :)

    There are two meanings of gevşek that I know.. One is "loose" (like a loose screw). The other one is "lazy, laidback person".
     
  17. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    How interesting that an idle man is a loose person - and the farting ... ;-)

    As for Hebrew-Tamil: I checked and I believe they don't have the same root.
     
  18. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    משוחרר meshukhrar can be used for "free of social limits"(acceptable/normal/regular social interactivity)
    שחרר shikhrer can be used for farted.
     
  19. mataripis Senior Member

    In Tagalog, Liberation is "Pagpapalaya", Pag paalpas and Pakalasin. "Loose" is " kalasin while to loosen is " luwagan"(lu-agan).
     
  20. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I don't see any links between any of those - or should I ? I'd love to get more information on the four Tagalog words...
     

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