1. Bobbity Senior Member

    Ireland
    English-Ireland
    Hi,
    Does anyone have any ideas how you would translate 'louangeur' into English?
    The context is: After a man praises a woman's favourite author at length in an attempt to impress her, she says:
    "Vous etes le meilleur louangeur que je ne connaisse"
    Thanks!!
     
  2. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hello Bobbity,
    A good synomyn would be "flatteur" = Personne qui flatte.
    So my attempt is "You're the best flatterer I know."
     
  3. franc 91 Senior Member

    France
    English - GB
    Oh you're just plamàsing me, isn't that so?
     
  4. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Nice one franc 91. :)
    In an Irish context that'd work well, since plámásaí = flatterer in Irish
     
  5. Bobbity Senior Member

    Ireland
    English-Ireland
    Hi,
    There's a very irish feel to this thread!! I think plamàs would get the meaning across but mightn't be understood by American readers (or even some British?)

    I was thinking maybe: "You're a charmer...You're a great one for the talk..."???
    Thanks very much for your suggestions anyway!
     
  6. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Tut, tut, gentlemen, the use of accents (síneadh fada's) is not optional in Irish. ;)

    Oops, that's sínte fada in the plural.
     
  7. franc 91 Senior Member

    France
    English - GB
    Well I only have an AZERTY clavier a chara
     
  8. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    That's no excuse. ;) My keyboard is French too, yet the "á é í ó ú Á É Í Ó Ú" are not much of a problem.


    See here for some possible solutions.
     
  9. Pedro y La Torre

    Pedro y La Torre Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English (Ireland)
    I can't say I've ever come across plamàs in Dublin. Is this a culchie thing? :D
     
  10. franc 91 Senior Member

    France
    English - GB
    I've been told on good authority (on another forum that deals with Irish/Gaeilge translation) that in fact 'plamas' with a fada on both 'a's derives from the French (or Norman French it might be more correct to say) word - blancmange or blancmanger - apparently it was something that impressed Irish speakers and became something to brag about.
     
  11. L'irlandais

    L'irlandais Senior Member

    Dreyeckland/Alsace region
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Thanks a million franc 91,
    Great stuff.
    Any corrections on my proposed pronunciations is welcome, it's new to me.

    It makes me smile looking at a 12 century attempt at European unity, a Gaelgóir trying to pronounce correctly in Norman the name of the dessert being served at table.
    The term has come to mean flatterer, because of the subsequent treacherous confiscation of lands under the Norman feudal system.
    But for a few months their was a genuine attempt (by certain parties) to get to know the stranger. ;)

    Here's a parallel discussion over on the Irish language part of these forums, with a recipe for blancmange. :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2011

Share This Page