loved to have come/came

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Baffled007, Jun 21, 2013.

  1. Baffled007 New Member

    English - UK
    Hello all

    Which one of the following sentences (if either) is grammatically correct:-

    1) I would've loved to have come if I'd still been up north.

    2) I would've loved to have came if I'd still been up north.

    Thanks in advance and best regards.

    Baffled007
     
  2. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    What do you think?

    (Hint: You might want to compare two sentences like "He has come" and "He has came.")
     
  3. Baffled007 New Member

    English - UK
    Thanks for the reply.

    Yes, I was googling 'come' and came to the decision that (1) is correct. I think what was troubling me was the fact that 'come' is the past participle of 'come', whereas 'came' is the past tense but not the pp.

    Cheers. :)
     
  4. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    Exactly - only (1) is correct.

    We use the past participle to make lots of compound tenses in English: "he will have come," "he has come," "he had come," "I would have come"... including the past infinitive "to have come."
     
  5. Baffled007 New Member

    English - UK
    Is it quite unusual for the pp to be the same as the present tense? I also came across run...
     
  6. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    It's just as unusual as any of the other odd oddities of English. "Run" is a good example of the same thing.
     
  7. Baffled007 New Member

    English - UK
    Ok, thanks a lot for your help.
     
  8. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    It happens with some short verbs of Anglo-Saxon origin. It is more common in the US than the UK.
    For example: 'fit' (US), 'fitted' UK.
    'Quit' is now common in the UK, but 'quitted' was standard till fairly recently.
     
  9. Alby84 Senior Member

    Boston
    American English
    Don't be shocked if you hear people say:

    I had drank/ran/sang in colloquial speech. It's certainly not "correct," but I hear it ALL the time. Understand it as "drunk/run/sung," but never repeat it like this is.
     

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