Más trampas que en una película de chinos

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Elviuli, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. Elviuli Junior Member

    Albacete - España
    España (Español)
    Good morning!

    I need to translate this sentence "Más trampas que en una película de chinos". I don't know if with a literal translation English native speakers will get the same meaning or if they use this expression. Could I use "More traps than in a Chinese film"? Or it would be better if I use "More traps than rodents for trapping"?

    Thank you very much!!!
     
  2. pubman Senior Member

    Sorry Elviuli but "More traps than in a Chinese Film" would mean nothing in British English.
     
  3. Elviuli Junior Member

    Albacete - España
    España (Español)
    Thank you pubman, I had a tiny chance that it could make sense... Anyway, I think "More traps than rodents for trapping" will suit. Or I least I hope so!

    Have a nice weekend!
     
  4. pubman Senior Member

    You're welcome, we do have a phrase similar to "More traps than rodents..." but I just can't think of it right now.:confused:

    You have a nice weekend also
     
  5. Chispa123

    Chispa123 Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    USA English
    Perhaps "more mouse traps than mice?"
     
  6. pubman Senior Member

    Hi chispa, that is certainly more elegant in my opinion than 'rodents'
     
  7. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    More traps than a magician’s stage?
     
  8. Elviuli Junior Member

    Albacete - España
    España (Español)
    Then, do you think more mouse traps than mice is the better option? As I am not a native speaker I don't know which one to choose :(
    Thank you!!
     
  9. Filis Cañí Senior Member

    The hills
    Triana, caló
    Esa sería la mejor opción si quisiera usted decir algo como “más jefes que indios”. No cuadra con “más trampas que . . . algo exagerao”.
     
  10. Josette Senior Member

    Great Britain, English
    "Más trampas que en una película de chinos" seems to be used in a variety of contexts, according to the following definition:

    tener más trampas que una película de chinosSer algo muy intrincado, engañoso o peligroso. <<Ten cuidado con este coche, porque, aunque parece que funciona bien, tiene más trampas que una película de chinos>>. A veces se emplea la expresión con el significado de tener una persona muchas deudas, otra de las acepciones de la palabra <<trampa>>.<< Ha pedido muchísimos créditos a los bancos y ahora tiene más trampas que una película de chinos>>. La literatura y el cine nos han transmitido una imagen de los chinos como expertos en idear toda suerte de maldades. (Ver <<Martirio chino.>>) (source: Academia.com)


    As far as I know, there's no equivalent idiomatic expression in English. If you're describing a film, a possible solution could be to say something like: "It has got more twists, turns and intrigue/red herrings than a Hitchcock film/Hollywood thriller/Agatha Christie mystery" (i.e. something that an English-speaking audience can easily relate to).
    Could you provide some more context? I think it would be helpful.
    Cheers,

    Josette

    (EDIT: Good point, Mrsmbird #13, for some reason, I thought the OP was talking about a film. We definitely need context.)
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2011
  11. ptak30

    ptak30 Senior Member

    More twists than a bag of pretzels
     
  12. Josette Senior Member

    Great Britain, English
    Hehe, yes I like that. I was also thinking of "more red herrings than a fish market" and "more twists than a roller coaster", etc. etc.
     
  13. mrsmbird Junior Member

    English - UK London
    What's the context for this? What are you describing? It will be easier to narrow down the right phrase.
     
  14. Elviuli Junior Member

    Albacete - España
    España (Español)
    The context is a conversation between two people, and one is telling the other to be careful with the interview he's having at the bank to ask for a loan. The interview itself is supposed to have a lot of "traps" because nowadays banks don't give money so easily...

    Anyway I like all your options, for which I really thank you!!!
     
  15. mrsmbird Junior Member

    English - UK London
    Twists and red herrings would only refer to films. There isn't an equivalent idiom but you could say "They will do everything they can to trip you up"
     

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