make a note of vs. take note of

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Ume, Jul 19, 2008.

  1. Hello.

    1) Please make a note of the following changes in reimbursement procedures, effective Monday next week.
    2) Please take note of the following changes in reimbursement procedures, effective Monday next week.


    Doesn't the first sound unnatural?
     
  2. Monkey F B I Senior Member

    Acton, MA
    English - USA
    They both sound ok to me!
     
  3. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    I agree...
     
  4. Monkey F B I and nzfauna,
    Thank you for the responses.

    Do the first and the second mean the same?
     
  5. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    Yes, they are perfectly synonymous :)
     
  6. "take note (of something)"
    This means "to pay attention to something".
    Does "make a note (of something)", too?
     
  7. Oiseau Pourqui?

    Oiseau Pourqui? Junior Member

    Begging to differ.

    Make a note of ... would usually infer that the reader should make a physical note of the changes (i.e. write them down somewhere).

    Take note of ... the reader would assume that they are just being made aware of the changes and need only make a mental note.

    Not sure if others agree but that's how I would read the two sentences.
     
  8. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    In this context, I think they would be understood in the same way.
     
  9. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I'm with you on this :).
     
  10. Thank you for the replies, everyone.

    Please make a note of the download link when it appears. If you lose or forget it, you may need to upload the file again.

    "make a note of something"
    This means "to write something down", doesn't it?
     
  11. gasman Senior Member

    Canada, English
    I would say so.
     
  12. nzfauna

    nzfauna Senior Member

    Wellington, New Zealand
    New Zealand, English
    Yes, but it could also refer to a mental note.

    For me:

    To take note of something [mental note]
    To make note of something [mental note]

    To take a note [i.e write something down]
    To make a note [not used?]

    To take a note of something [not used?]
    To make a note of something [mental note]

    Take notes! [imperative, write something down].
    Make notes! [not used?]

    Make notes on/about something [write something down]
    Take notes on/about something [write something down]
     
  13. Esteli New Member

    Spanish, Spain
    Take a note means not only pay attention but also write down or note down it, isnt it?
     
  14. Tazzler Senior Member

    Maryland
    American English
    I think only "make a note" is used when talking literally about writing.
     
  15. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    If we want someone to pay attention to something we're about to say, we use: Take note. (Without the article "a.")
     
  16. halmom Senior Member

    korean
    Then, in classroom, when you ask your students to write something down on their notes, can I say as follows?

    This is very important. I want you to take notes of this information on your notebook.
     
  17. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    I would say this:
    This is very important. I want you to write this information in your notebook.
     

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