make someone loyal to a brand [word for it?]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by camilasalles, Jan 8, 2013.

  1. camilasalles Junior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    I need a word, if it exists, that means " make (a client) loyal to a product, brand, service, etc... " in the sense that the person would only use that particular product/brand/service.
     
  2. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    I'm sure that some trendy businessman has invented such a word, but ordinary people would say "make customers loyal" or "win the loyalty of customers".

    Anybody who told me he was trying to "loyalise" :cross: or "fidelify" :cross: me would immediately lose my loyalty!
     
  3. camilasalles Junior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    Thanks! but I really need that in one word for a translation job I'm doing. Guess I'll use one of those, even if they are terrible.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 9, 2013
  4. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    No, please don't! I made them both up!
     
  5. camilasalles Junior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    I know you did! But that's what I was about to do anyway. I'll do it even worse , because I need something like a 'loyaliser' or a ' 'fidelifier'. Someone suggested 'retainer' but I'm not sure it conveys the same meaning. what to you think?
     
  6. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    A retainer is a fee paid to a regular free-lance to compensate for calling on him at inconvenient times.

    For the rest, I refuse to participate in the mangling of my native tongue!
     
  7. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    I'm not sure this helps, but in case it does...

    The term for this particular type of loyalty is "brand loyalty." There is, as far as I know, no word to describe the process of creating this, but the verb "create" is often used, e.g., "create brand loyalty." The noun phrase to describe the person doing the creating could be, I guess, "brand loyalty creator."

    Fedelify is a perfectly dreadful word - it sounds awful and I would have no idea what it was supposed to mean if I hadn't read this thread - and Keith should hang his head in shame and sorrow for making it up. ;) Loyalize is also perfectly dreadful but it is at least somewhat clearer.

    Despite that, I really urge you not to use either of them. There is no single word that says what you want to say (not that I've ever heard of, anyway), so why pretend there is?
     
  8. camilasalles Junior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    thank you both! I realize it's really absurd, but the system will only accept one word for it. I'll try and convince IT to change it, but think that's gonna be impossible. Horrible made up word it is, then!
     
  9. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    If you absolutely need one word (because it's for a certain box in a spreadsheet, for instance), it would help if you could clarify exactly what a "loyalizer" is. Is it A) the person or agent that causes the client to become loyal or B) the service provided or goods given to the client to help maintain his/her loyalty?

    If it's B), then I might suggest incentive.

    Also, there's the question of whether or not you need this word to be understandable to other people, without further information. If you're just going to invent your own jargon ("loyalizer" will need to be explained to anyone who encounters it), then you might as well just leave the word untranslated and provide an explanation.
     
  10. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    I agree with lucas. If you're going to invent your own jargon, you might just as well leave the word untranslated or insert a nonsense-word such as &^"->.
     
  11. frenchifried Senior Member

    France
    English - UK
    I adhere to a brand of tea -- and nothing will make me change.

    (An attempt at damage limitation -- Keith, I fear you are about to go viral!)
     
  12. gramman

    gramman Senior Member

    Oxford Dictionaries Online lists brander as a derivative of brand.

    Some examples of its use:
    There's a publication called Chicago Brander.

    For manglephiles, perhaps buyologist. :rolleyes:

    +++++
    Sorry, I forgot we were looking for a verb. It seems to me that good old brand may mean "to make (a client) loyal to a product, brand, service, etc."
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  13. gramman

    gramman Senior Member

    Brand is listed as a transitive verb in The Free Dictionary:
     
  14. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    We don't seem to know a verb that will mean "make loyal to a brand".

    Given that you are going to have to explain the meaning of the word in any case, I suggest 'convert', as in 'convert the consumer to a preference for your brand'. It has the advantage of being a familiar verb, and I think it will be easily understood in context.
     
  15. gramman

    gramman Senior Member

    attach or connect?
     
  16. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    I don't really understand gramman's logic, to be honest. The brander has to create the brand before anyone can become loyal to it; the two seem like completely different operations. And I've never seen "attach" or "connect" collocated with "brand" (not that it's impossible, it just feels odd).

    "Converter" could work, but only if it's the person doing the converting ( = making someone loyal to the brand). But that might not fit the situation described by camila, which I'm still not sure about.
     
  17. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    I understood this to be a request for a verb:
    However, we need to know what sort of information is to be entered in this blank if we are going to make useful suggestions.
     
  18. gramman

    gramman Senior Member

    Without interfering with Cagey's call for more information, allow me to respond to lucas-sp's post:

    >>don't really understand gramman's logic

    often an indication of clear thinking :eek:

    >>create the brand … [and make someone] … loyal to it; the two seem like completely different operations

    Well, perhaps not completely different. I can certainly see your point, but it could be argued that in order to be effective, the work done by a brander will necessarily inspire consumer loyalty. Branding that doesn't get this done is lousy branding. You'll (legitimately) say, "Well, it is branding." I'll respond, "It might as well be alligator-wrestling." You'll win the argument, so I concede. I have an old brain, and sometimes the connections don't work.

    >>I've never seen "attach" or "connect" collocated with "brand"

    I'm very much aware of my marked inability as a marketer, but I was going by what I saw when I looked around for brander. (Thought I had found a real jewel there that everyone was overlooking; turned out to be a plain old rock. :( ) Stuff like what's in this search return.
     
  19. camilasalles Junior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    this has all been very useful, thank you guys! but I'll explain a little better what it is that I need.

    I've been translating into English a sort of professional "personality" test. in the results there is a section where certain characteristics will be listed such as motivator,independent, intuitive aaaand this "fidelizador", who would be this person that makes the consumer loyal to a certain brand or product or service. and that's the word I need.

    Perhaps the best solution is, after all, to leave the word untranslated, and find some place where I can define it.

    Or, IT just informed me, I can use few words to define it and still use it as before. but I} don't know what could work. brand loyalty creator? that just sounds odd...
     
  20. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Sports metaphors might work. "Fan" or "diehard fan" or "rabid fan" can be used in this context.

    I am a diehard fan of Hasselblad cameras. I have no interest in other brands.

    Also addiction metaphors.

    I always need my Starbucks hit each morning. I guess I'm a Starbucks addict.

     
  21. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    Sounds like a useful recruit for the mafia ("I made him an offer he couldn't refuse").
    How can anyone make another person loyal to anything?

    Seriously, what is the activity in question? What would this mysterious person actually do?
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  22. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    True. You create loyalty by your actions, just as you engender trust by your actions.
     
  23. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    It sounds odd because it is odd. Advertising agencies have employees who as part of their job are supposed to help their clients create brand loyalty, but I don't think those job titles ("art director," "copywriter," "creative director," etc.) will help you because "creating brand loyalty" isn't all those people do. What you're looking for, I think, is a word to describe a single factor in the overall job of marketing products, and as far as I know, there is no single word that does that.

    So I looked at what particular aspect you seemed to be trying to describe, and I picked "brand loyalty creator" because it seemed to describe what you're talking about in the most accurate and least stupid-sounding way. I don't pretend it's good, though ;) - it's just the best I could come up with. I am pretty sure there is something better out there, I just can't imagine what it might be.

    Here's another possibility: How about if you use a single word, such as "marketer" or "brander" but mark it with an asterisk and then explain what you mean by that in the footnote:
    Motivator Independent Intuitive Brander*
    .........
    .........
    (and then below the table or whatever these characteristics will be listed on)
    * "Brander" refers to the individual who is responsible for helping to create brand loyalty in consumers.
     
  24. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    I still feel there is a need to identify the activity or occupation before inventing terms.

    Is it customer care? Is it account management? After-sales service?
    What does the person do? Are they office-based or in the field?

    Another thought: is it a specific activity (such as above) or is it a personal characteristic, such as 'the ability to inspire loyalty'? If it is the latter, then there is no specific term for it. The nearest might be 'charisma' or 'infectious enthusiasm' or even 'leadership'.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  25. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    I just Googled and "loyalty manager" is a job description. And "loyalty management" is field of business. Who'd a guessed?
     
  26. camilasalles Junior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    that's awesome! thanks!
     
  27. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    Loyalty manager sounds fine...but I must just add that it's not a well-known term, even in the industry (I've never heard it, for example), so you're still going to have to define it somewhere. Sorry!
     
  28. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    A description of the responsibilities would probably cover that.

    It does sound like an invented position designed to keep the employer's useless son out of trouble though.
     
  29. gramman

    gramman Senior Member

    A loyalty manager appears to be focused more on customer relations than branding. Of course, camilasalles wants a word for a person who "makes the customer loyal." So it's not clear, to me at least, which one should be the focus.

    I found references to Customer Insight and Loyalty Manager and Rewards and Loyalty Manager. They seem to be employed by hotels, the hospitality industry in general, airlines, etc.

    Here are some job descriptions:
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  30. JuanEscritor

    JuanEscritor Senior Member

    Minnesota
    English - AE
    How about religious terms?

    Indoctrinate
    Convert


    Or more direct (not-so-pretty) terms:

    brainwash

    No?
     
  31. morior_invictus

    morior_invictus Senior Member

    Slovak
    Hi camilasalles,

    Since there are many people in an organization who participate in building customer loyalty to a particular brand, you can`t influence this process by personal characteristics of one person (not even with your "fidelizador" or "brand (loyalty) builder" :)).

    If you compile some personality test for this "brand builder", he will have the same characteristics as a brand manager should have, i.e. a creative, outgoing and energetic personality, the motivation and flexibility, the ability to deal with stress, problem solving and decision making skills etc., so why create unusual and strange words?

    Like JustKate, I have never heard of "loyalty manager" as of a job position. I only know that this is an IT solution for a company, similar to CRM. Just imagine, that some organization has created this position – then a high degree of this specialization and division of work would, inter alia, make a coordination more difficult.

    This is how I see it.
     
  32. ghk128 Junior Member

    English - Canada/US
    What's wrong with "promoter?"
     
  33. AngelEyes

    AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    That's a promotions marketer: the person who identifies the target consumer for a certain product and aims the advertising dollars at those specific buyers. His goal would be to develop a base of loyal customers.

    Since there are many areas of advertising that go into reeling in the money, there may be other titles you could use, too.

    But to begin with, it's all about marketing, the base plan on who would want what you've got to sell.
     
  34. ghk128 Junior Member

    English - Canada/US
    That's one use of "promoter," it's often also used for people who develop bases of customers for nightclubs and venues like that. I don't think it's necessarily at the advertising level.
     
  35. AngelEyes

    AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    Okay, you could shorten it to something like Cosmetics Marketer or Fashion Marketer even. Pick any area you like as well, not just nightclubs. The job would still include promoting an agenda to create a consumer loyalty base of buyers.

    I admit there are many terms that would work.

    Maybe a more generic title might be Advertising Marketer. Or Advertising Executive.

    Advertising and marketing would be in the middle of it all.
     
  36. Londres

    Londres Senior Member

    Hertfordshire
    English/England
    Persuade

    To make someone believe, to convince them, win them over,sell them something.
     
  37. Hussen New Member

    Swedish
    From reading your posts and descriptions I get the feeling you are really trying to describe personal/professional traits rather then activities?

    If this is the case maybe "loyalty creator" would be suitable?
     
  38. gramman

    gramman Senior Member

    Sounds like the job description of a WRF moderator! ☺

    My off-topic posts are typically, and of course, justifiably, deleted. I thought I'd impudently sass them with this one. ;)
     
  39. frenchifried Senior Member

    France
    English - UK
    'I've been translating into English a sort of professional "personality" test. in the results there is a section where certain characteristics will be listed such as motivator,independent, intuitive aaaand this "fidelizador", who would be this person that makes the consumer loyal to a certain brand or product or service. and that's the word I need.'

    I've finally understood.:eek: The nearest I can get is persuasive strategist or one who fosters customer loyalty - but neither is as tidy as 'fidelizador':(
     
  40. Londres

    Londres Senior Member

    Hertfordshire
    English/England
    Agreed, from today onwards I am going to be a 'fidelizador', it's the new black:D
     
  41. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Emilia–Romagna, Italy
    English (England)
    Just for the record (I chanced across this page trying to find the right term from Italian - hi!) you haven’t invented "loyalise": it’s in the Shorter OED as “E17” i.e. dating from 1600–1629.
     
  42. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    There seems to be a mismatch in concepts in this requirement, between (a) 'characteristics ... such as motivator, independent, intuitive' (which are personality characteristics) and (b) ' "fidelizador", who would be this person that makes the consumer loyal to a certain brand or product or service ' (which is a job description).

    If the need is for (b), a job title, then the job of 'loyalty manager' would seem to fit. That is the person who manages the loyalty card scheme and other incentives designed to attract and keep customers.

    If the need is for (a), a psychological term describing a personality characteristic, then an adjectival expression is needed such as 'confidence-inspiring' or 'loyalty-inspiring'.
     

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