Make the cut

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Antonio, Jan 2, 2005.

  1. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Hi Group,

    What does the phrase "Make the cut" mean? I know it has different meanings.
     
  2. grego47 Senior Member

    Sevilla España
    USA English
    Make the cut may mean to possess the mental or physical ability to achieve a standard
     
  3. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    "Make the cut" means to succeed or do well/good enough. An example would be in the drafts someone will make the cut.

    If someone has another definition or a different example, please let me know.
     
  4. Tobycek Senior Member

    England, English
    I think the expression comes from golf originally.
    If you make the cut, your final score after the 18th hole is at or above the target (=the cut) to progress to the second round. So if the cut was 2 under par, you could say
    "Tiger Woods didn't make the cut as he finished on 1 over par".
    By extension, it means to meet a certain qualification in any situation.
    e.g. "Lots of people were interviewed for this position, but not many of them made the cut."
    I can't think of any other meanings... but there probably are some!
     
  5. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    "Make the cut" means the same thing as "The final cut"?
     
  6. kens

    kens Senior Member

    Canada - English
    In sports teams, before the season starts, there are rounds of "cuts" where the coach will get rid of the poorer players. The last round of cuts is called the "final cut". If you're still on the team after the final cut, you've "made the cut". :)

    The term "the final cut" can also refer to movies, because editing a movie is sometimes called "cutting" (they used to cut film strips with scissors and tape them together to create a scene change. Maybe they still do that, I'm not sure!). The "final cut", therefore, refers to the finished version of the movie, ready to be seen by the audience. Different versions of the same movie are sometimes called "cuts" -- e.g., the "director's cut" means the director's version of the movie.

    If a movie director shoots a scene for his movie, but then decides later not to use that scene in "the final cut", we say that the scene was "left on the cutting room floor."
     
  7. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Also "The final cut" could be the final installment of the trilogy. Just one question, in a job interview if he "made the cut" instead of saying this previous phrase can I say "He made the final cut and got the job" or not?
     
  8. kens

    kens Senior Member

    Canada - English
    Only if he had to undergo more than one interview (with the same company). "He made the final cut" would mean that he succeeded in the last interview he had with them. If you want to say that he got the job, it's better to say simply "He made the cut", i.e., he succeeded.

    But "making the cut" is not usually used for getting a job. If the company is hiring several people at once (e.g., for theatre auditions), then it's fine to say "He made the cut". But if there's only one job being offered, we probably wouldn't say it. We'd say "He got the job", or something like that.
     
  9. Edwin

    Edwin Senior Member

    Tampa, Florida, USA
    USA / Native Language: English
    I think it has been quite a long time since Tiger Woods failed to make the cut for any tournament he has entered. :) In fact I seem to recall hearing that he has the current record for most consecutive tournaments entered without failing to make the cut.
     
  10. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English

    How about also: He made the grade. This means that he qualified for the job. I've heard this more than made the cut when talking about jobs.
     
  11. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    If he got the job. Can I say instead of "making the cut"; "He close the deal?
     
  12. Edwin

    Edwin Senior Member

    Tampa, Florida, USA
    USA / Native Language: English
    I agree with that. When I think of ''making the cut'' I think of a long line of applicants, players, or whatever, all lined up or ranked according to some criterion. Then the person in charge ''cuts'' the line at some point. Those above the cut are accepted (they make the cut) and those below the cut are sent home (they fail to make the cut).
     
  13. Edwin

    Edwin Senior Member

    Tampa, Florida, USA
    USA / Native Language: English
    First, as has been said, for most jobs you don't say ''he made the cut'' when you mean ''he got the job''. And you would never say ''He close the deal''. Under some circumstances you would say ''He closed the deal''. But normally you wouldn't use that for someone who got a job. If you already have a job and you are selling something or trying to make an agreement, when the sale is completed or the agreement to do whatever is made, then you may be said to have closed the deal.
     
  14. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    on the same page; "He closed the deal" means "He pull it off and he succeed", right?
     
  15. Tobycek Senior Member

    England, English
    Sorry, I guess I was a bit misleading when I said the phrase could be used in the context of a job interview.

    I was thinking of a figurative use such as a situation where maybe 20 people were interviewed, of which 5 made it to the second interview.
    So 5 of them "made the cut". :)
     
  16. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English

    Yes, that's right.
     
  17. lsp

    lsp Senior Member

    NY
    US, English
    pulled
    succeeded
     

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