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make tremendous demands of/on

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Allegro molto, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. Allegro molto Senior Member

    Japanese
    Hello

    The new aircraft makes tremendous demands of pilots.
    (from Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary)

    Is 'on' possible instead of the 'of'?
    If possible, what is the difference in meaning between the two sentences?

    Thank you
     
  2. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    You make [adj.] demands/a demand on someone/something who/that is able, to an extent, to bear the strain – your example. – in this sense on = upon - Edit to add, the original post had 'on', whereas now it shows 'of.'

    You make demands of someone/something when you want something from them, “The rebels captured the king and made many demands of parliament. – in this sense of = from
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2013
  3. JuanEscritor

    JuanEscritor Senior Member

    Minnesota
    English - AE
    No, it is not possible. The verb to use for on is put:

    The new aircraft puts tremendous demands on pilots.
     
  4. JuanEscritor

    JuanEscritor Senior Member

    Minnesota
    English - AE
    Interesting. Can you give us an example?
     
  5. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    From OED: 1816 L. Hunt Story Rimini iii. 83 He made..A sort of fierce demand on your respect.

    1874 J. R. Green Short Hist. Eng. People iv. §1. 161 The accession of a new sovereign..was at once followed by the demand of his homage.
     
  6. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2013
  7. JuanEscritor

    JuanEscritor Senior Member

    Minnesota
    English - AE
    Interesting; I would have never used this expression and have never encountered it that I can recall.
     

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