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maker of preparedness [factor paratus?]

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by dcubed, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. dcubed New Member

    English
    < factor paratus >

    As a motto. Does that make sense or should it be changed?
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012
  2. Cagey non modo mod

    California
    English - US
    Hello dcubed. :)

    What do you want to say?
     
  3. dcubed New Member

    English
    Roughly, maker of preparedness.
     
  4. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    (a) factor paratus is apparently not a classical Latin expression, but in later legal Latin it would mean 'a perpetrator who is ready'. In pre-classical Latin it might mean 'a maker of apparel'.

    (b) What do you mean by a 'maker of preparedness'? I'm afraid I find this rather unclear.
    If you could put your idea into other words, there may well be a good Latin expression to say what you are looking for.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012
  5. dcubed New Member

    English
    I'm thinking of opening a ecommerce store selling paracord items and possibly other survival items. I make the paracord items, which can be used for survival. Hence, something like maker of preparedness.
     
  6. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    It is difficult to render 'maker of preparedness'. I doubt if a classical term exists for 'preparedness'.
    You could say paratum omnem paramus 'we prepare all equipment' or parandum curamus 'we take care of the equipping (or preparing) process'.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2012
  7. Peano Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spanish, Catalan
  8. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British

    According to Lewis and Short, paratio is a rare term and is not used by Cicero, but is occasionally used by other writers instead of comparatio. This means that if paratio were appropriate, it would be better to use comparatio instead.

    However, neither paratio nor comparatio is appropriate here: these words mean 'the process of preparing', not 'the state of being prepared'.

    As for factor, Lewis and Short show that it is not classical. It is, however, used in later legal texts to mean 'perpetrator'.

    Even if the words factor parationis or factor comparationis were correct Latin for 'maker of preparation' (which they are not), this is still not what the questioner wishes to say.

    'Preparedness' means 'the state of being prepared'. This in the context of the questioner's posts presumably means the final state of someone equipped for paracord activities and ready for whatever need may arise.
    In other words, the message to be conveyed is 'We put you in the position of being fully prepared for paracord action'.

    Hence my suggestions above in post 6, which come as close to that message as practicable in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2012
  9. Peano Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spanish, Catalan
    According to what dictionary? I guessed paratio may mean 'the state of being prepared' as well as 'the process of preparing'.
     
  10. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    Well, nouns formed in -io on the supine stem express the action of the verb.
    Lewis and Short for paratio say 'the preparing, getting, procuring'.
     

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