mal de orina

Discussion in 'Medical Terminology' started by Riverdoc, May 1, 2005.

  1. Riverdoc Senior Member

    Ukiah, California
    U.S.A./English
    Example sentence/context:
    Hola a todos,

    Acabo de regresar de mi cuarta misión médica a Guatemala.
    Hemos establecido clínicas diarias en aldeas por la frontera con El Salvador. Cada visita, he notado una queja (síntoma) muy común entre los pacientes masculinos, la queja de "mal de orina".
    No pude entender qué quisieron decir. Muchas veces cuchichearon "mal de orina", con la mano cubriendo la boca, como si no quisieran
    que otros les pudieran oír. Cuando pregunté por detalles, usualmente se quejaron de un olor fuerte de la orina y un color amarillo oscuro o anaranjado. A veces se quejaron que les ardió cuando orinaron.
    Siempre la examinación era normal y la prueba de la orina también.
    Me pregunté si les molestara con pensamientos de enfermedades transmitidas por relaciones sexuales o problemas de impotencia.

    Gracias por cualquier ayuda que puedan darme.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2015
  2. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    Riverdoc, "mal de orina" is a very nonspecific, popular, colloquial, noninformed designation of any and all of the signs and symptoms associated with urination or the genitourinary tract. It can be anything from all the list of urinary signs and symptoms you will find in your textbook. It may range from any type of difficulty to urinate, difficulty or hesitancy in starting the stream, dysuria, burning, pain, urethral discharge, to bleeding, hematuria, incontinence, overflow incontinence, lack of force, dribbling, increased frequency, etc. You name it, whatever you can imagine, it can be.

    So, you may be dealing with urethritis, cystitis, prostatitis, STD, stones, tumors, in a word, everything. Consequently, you will have to really dig up information from them by asking a lot of questions.

    These people are used to telling some health care worker or pharmacist that they have "mal de orina" and receiving either some antibiotic (whichever one the clinic happens to have--not necessarily the appropriate one) or a pill for symptomatic relief without much more work up or diagnosis. They may even get some herbal medicine from a witch doctor.

    Sorry that I didn't solve your problem.
     
  3. Riverdoc Senior Member

    Ukiah, California
    U.S.A./English
    Gracias Sergio,

    This is what I more or less suspected.

    Riverdoc
     

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