maladie du pays (sic)

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by Fospia, Dec 7, 2008.

  1. Fospia

    Fospia Senior Member

    English (United States) and Spanish (Cub
    In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Victor describes how he feels in italics using this phrase. Is this an accepted phrase to describe homesickness?
    My French teacher told me that it is the result of translating English to French and stubbornly refused to believe that it had been written in novel by a Swiss. Being that my French teacher is not French I wanted to find out for myself. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. melu85 Senior Member

    Paris
    France/French
    In French, we say "avoir le mal du pays", which translates "to be homesick".
    So I guess homesickness would be "le mal du pays".
     
  3. Xavier11222 Senior Member

    Paris
    France French
    Well, you're not including the phrase here, so... I guess homesickness is good to describe homesickness? :)
    Also, I'm not sure what the argument is about.
     
  4. xtrasystole

    xtrasystole Senior Member

    France
    What phrase are you talking about? :confused:
     
  5. melu85 Senior Member

    Paris
    France/French
    The "phrase" is referring to is..."la maladie du pays":), which was originally the title of the thread. I changed it and didn't realize the phrase didn't appear in the thread.
     
  6. xtrasystole

    xtrasystole Senior Member

    France
    Ah, bon ! Tu as corrigé le titre du fil.

    Comme tu le disais, melu85, l'expression correcte en français de France est 'le mal du pays'.

    (À noter que 'Le Mal du Pays' est le titre original d'une pièce pour piano de Franz Liszt qu'il avait écrite en Suisse (from Années de Pélerinage, book 1, Suisse)).
     
  7. Xavier11222 Senior Member

    Paris
    France French
    Ah, that's what it was.

    Then your teacher is wrong! But don't tell her that you asked someone from the internet - instead, say that you happened upon the phrase in Mme de Stael's Corinne.
    Je me sentais saisie par la maladie du pays, la plus inquiète douleur qui puisse s'emparer de l'âme
    Then you can admit that you found it there, under "sens 5."
    To her credit, you teacher certainly never heard it - you would say "mal du pays" these days, to mean a "maladie du pays" (general nostalgia) specific to those far from home.
     
  8. xtrasystole

    xtrasystole Senior Member

    France
    I didn't know, Xavier, that 'maladie du pays' was in use at the time. Thank you.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 8, 2008

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