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maquila / maquiladora (México)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Citizen of the world, Oct 26, 2006.

  1. Citizen of the world Senior Member

    Caracas
    English, UK
    Hello dear foreros,

    I am desperately trying to find the English translation for 'maquila' suited to my text. I have looked at all the relevant threads I found (as well as the RAE definition), with the two links below seemingly most relevant, but wanted to check what others thought as I can't be sure, having never used or even heard the term before.

    My phrase is from a political text about Mexico, which at this point is talking about increased exportation of goods to the US under the FTAA and its impact in Mexico:

    El problema radica en que el impulso exportador se concentró en la maquila, que sólo adquiere un [FONT=&quot]3[/FONT]% de sus componentes en el mercado nacional, ...

    Is it likely that in this case maquila refers to production exclusively for export, which I gather is one of the meanings from the threads I read?

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=29127

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=17684

    I look forward to any replies, thank you.
     
  2. DCPaco Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA
    We use the word in quotes or italics...and when they refer to these type of plants (factories) they even say: "the maquila plants".

    The maquila phenomenon is the exportation of the plant. The plants went to Mexico and other third world countries rather than bringing laborers to the United States where these plants were. For example, Levi's and Fruit of the Loom took their plants to Mexico, and hired Mexican people to produce the exact same product, but paid far less for the same item's production. It was something that came as an accidental consequence of NAFTA. After they realized how much this damaged cities that depended on these sweat shops for employment, the U.S. Government started a "rehabilitation program" to get these poor displaced people to get other careers. My sister was an industrial engineer for Levi's and now is a house wife because in her town there is no longer a need for Industrial Engineers.
     
  3. colombo-aussie

    colombo-aussie Senior Member

    Australia
    Spanish - Colombian
    Hi mate

    Maquila doesn't have translation into english, by the way i'm giving to you de meaning:

    What is a maquila?: The short answer is a maquiladora is a factory or assembly plant operated in Mexico under preferential tariff programs established by the U.S. and Mexican governments to encourage the development of industry in Mexico. Mexico allows materials to be used in maquilas to enter duty-free, provided the finished product is then immediately exported out of Mexico. The U.S. in turn charges these products a much lower tariff than products from other countries.
     
  4. Citizen of the world Senior Member

    Caracas
    English, UK
     
  5. Citizen of the world Senior Member

    Caracas
    English, UK
    Oh, puts my little explanation to shame! :eek: Ha ha ha

    Did you find that definition somewhere, or is it yours?
     
  6. DCPaco Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA
    I agree. This is a good definition of what a Maquila is. You might want the source that Colombo-Aussie used here.
     
  7. colombo-aussie

    colombo-aussie Senior Member

    Australia
    Spanish - Colombian
    Hey mate,

    I've found it, nothing to worry about it. jaja

    Cheers mate.
     
  8. Citizen of the world Senior Member

    Caracas
    English, UK
    Colombo-Aussie,

    Might you be able to share your source for me to use? It'd be very helpful if you could.

    Thanks
     
  9. colombo-aussie

    colombo-aussie Senior Member

    Australia
    Spanish - Colombian
  10. Citizen of the world Senior Member

    Caracas
    English, UK
  11. colombo-aussie

    colombo-aussie Senior Member

    Australia
    Spanish - Colombian
    jajaja anytime my friend.........
     
  12. Citizen of the world Senior Member

    Caracas
    English, UK
    :) ta very much
     
  13. monkeycita74

    monkeycita74 Senior Member

    Mexico
    Mexico English/Spanish
    FARMOUT this is what's used in English for the Spanish word MAQUILA used in metal-mechanical industry. I hope I'm still helpful.
     
  14. monalisa07 Junior Member

    mexico
    spanish
    Here is another reference I hope you find helpful,
    City of San Diego Maquiladoras/Twin Plants[SIZE=-1]Maquiladoras (also known as "twin plants") are manufacturing plants in Mexico with the parent company's administration facility in the United States. ...
    [/SIZE]
     
  15. Juan Carlos Garling

    Juan Carlos Garling Senior Member

    Chile/Argentina
    Spanish Chile/Argentina
    Maquila is a system whereby a company produces goods for and with components supplied by another party. It not necessarily related to export, as in the case you refer to in Mexico, where American companies export the components to Mexico (on a temporary basis, probably without taxation) and import the finished product thus saving on labor. Mexico would be better off if all or most of the components were produced in the country.

    Big manufacturing companies that occasionally fail to have enough production capacity and cannot cope with orders, may entrust maquiladores with assembling for them.

    This is known as outsourcing, having others to produce/assemble for you.
     
  16. Mariaguadalupe

    Mariaguadalupe Senior Member

    Mexico
    Mexico, Spanish-English
    Juan Carlos,

    You are right. In the truest sense of the word, maquila (maquilar) is outsourcing. However, when it refers to the system of maquiladoras as they pertain exclusively to Mexico, then it is a whole different concept. (Temporary import of raw materials to be then exported as finished goods back to its country of origin. Little or tax exempt in Mexico and reduced tariffs in US) It has been explained by the links provided above. (Posts 10 & 14)
     

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