maschera (Arlecchino)

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by salander, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. salander

    salander Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    I think that the English word "mask" only refers to the disguise that you wear on your face. How could I translate la maschera di Arlecchino then? this is referred to the whole dress and I find no English equivalent
     
  2. effeundici Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian - Tuscany
    I think it's disguise
     
  3. salander

    salander Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Yes, but does it sound nice: the disguise of Arlecchino? Blah
     
  4. effeundici Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian - Tuscany
    The Arlecchino disguise?
     
  5. coeurdenids Senior Member

    English
    Hmm . . . all that comes to mind are costume, disguise, garb. This is like trying to explain the difference between qualita and quality, you know? There may be no true equivalent because it comes from commedia and that's all integrated in its own language.
     
  6. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2009
  7. salander

    salander Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Oh yes OK no solution then, a cul-de-sac
     
  8. niklavjus Senior Member

    Italiano (Italia)
    Non sono sicuro di capire esattamente quel che chiedi. Una frase completa di esempio aiuterebbe.
    Se intendi l'espressione usata per riferirsi ai personaggi, allora dovrebbe essere "stock comic character".
    Se invece vuoi conoscere il verbo da usare in luogo di travestirsi, penso che "to dress" e "to mask" dovrebbero andar bene.
    Per riferirsi al costume, non saprei... forse "fancy dress".
     
  9. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    Ma la parola ha molte accezzioni di più, come verbo significa nascondere (qualcosa)...
    Come sostantivo significa qualcosa che si mette in faccia per non essere riconosciuto..
    'Disguise' va bene come traduzione di mascherare (in certi casi) e suona bene (mi riferisco alla tua domanda in post #3)

    @nik, non ho mai sentito 'stock comic character'.. anche, per dire travestirsi, 'to dress' e 'to mask' non vanno bene come traduzione.. direi solo 'to disguise' ... 'to mask' può essere usato in certi casi ma non direi che sia assai comune...

    (scusa per le correzioni, ma è importante precisare gli errori:()
     
  10. coeurdenids Senior Member

    English
    I think what I've heard most frequently is "get into costume", or "get into full costume" (mettersi in maschera?)
     
  11. lingogal Senior Member

    U.S. English
    A stock comic character is one that is an archetype or a character that everyone would recognize in a particular role or function. It is perfectly good English. :)
     
  12. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    Ah, I didn't mean it wasn't correct, only that I'd never heard it before, what would some examples of stock comic characters be?
    Do you mean like the typical baddie in the castle with the lightning going off, set up with surroundings that you instantly know he is the bad guy?

    In response to the question I'd call it an outfit (or costume)surely. (Arlecchino's outfit / An Arlecchino outfit/costume)
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2009
  13. lingogal Senior Member

    U.S. English
    Yes, that is the idea. For example, in Italian commedia dell'arte, the audience could recognize some characters simply from their costumes: by a particular mask, by a checked pair of pants and so on. The spectators would also know what kind of behavior to expect from that character no matter which play he might appear in.

    Here is a look at the checkerboard outfit or costume for Harlequin: http://images.google.com/imgres?img...el=s&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&sa=N&um=1
     
  14. niklavjus Senior Member

    Italiano (Italia)
    Don't worry, Alxmrphi, I totally agree with you about corrections. :)

    I suggested to dress and to mask just because salander was unsatisified with the previous suggestions. Now, I see that really their use it isn't common. However, to say "to go to the party dressed as Harlequin" would not be completely wrong. What do you think?

    I see lingogal, who I thank, already has pointed out what I meant about "stock comic character", anyhow, for some example about that, I put it into a search engine and the first three outcomes I got from not Italian sources are:

    "I am trying to trace the origin of the name of a stock comic character from the Italian Renaissance's Commedia dell'arte. The character's name was Harlequin."

    "We have the sense that Polonius is a stock comic character misplaced in a bloody tragedy."

    "harlequin
    1. Theatre -* a stock comic character originating in the commedia dell'arte; the foppish lover of Columbine in the English harlequinade. He is usually represented in diamond-patterned multicoloured tights, wearing a black mask
    "
    * The hyphen is missing in the original text.
     
  15. salander

    salander Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    My doubts only concerned the translation of the noun maschera di..., while I pretty well could translate mascherarsi. Unfortunately there is not more context because it is just the caption of a photograph showing a Sardinian maschera - Alrlecchino was just an example to make you all understand what it was about. Maybe outfit is alright...
     
  16. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    OP translates it:

    2. (travestimento) costume, masquerade, fancy dress U BE ; (persona travestita) masker; in ~ in fancy dress; mettersi in ~ to disguise oneself; ballo in ~ masked ball, masquerade, fancy dress ball BE

    'Costume' (as I suggested in Post 6) is preferable to 'outfit' in this context, but it is used.

    harlequin outfit

    harlequin costume
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2009
  17. salander

    salander Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Thank you everybody. Thank you for taking part in the discussion and for suggesting so many alternatives! I'll go with costume then. Thank you Charles
     

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