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master of arts in/degree in

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Magg, Jan 17, 2005.

  1. Magg Senior Member

    Spain
    Spain / Spanish
    Hello,

    Are they the same?

    Cheers
    Magg
     
  2. lauranazario Moderatrix

    Puerto Rico
    Puerto Rico/Español & English
    In USA if you don't specify and say "a degree" it is often assumed to be a Bachelor's degree. A Master's degree is called just that, while a doctoral degree is most commonly known as a Ph.D.

    Saludos,
    LN
     
  3. cristóbal Senior Member

    EEUU
    EEUU/Inglés
    In the US at least, they are not the same.
    A Master's degree is usually a postgraduate (not always though) degree whereas a "degree in" usually implies a Bachelor's degree, which is an undergraduate degree.

    However, "degree in" can mean Master's, Bachelor's, or Doctorate for that matter, so unless you specify exactly which degree it is... I would assume it's an undergraduate bachelor's degree.

    In certain fields, like Architecture (mine!) for example, many undergraduate programs offer a Master's degree as a first-professional undergraduate degree. While other universities have similar programs but only award a Bachelor's degree at the end of the curriculum. There is actually no difference between the two in THIS case... they are both undergraduate professional degrees.
     
  4. Magg Senior Member

    Spain
    Spain / Spanish
    Jesus!, I thought it was going to be easier.

    What do you mean by undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.
    Does it have to do with undergraduate = 'diplomatura' and postgraduate = 'licenciatura'?

    In Spain, once you have a 'licenciatura' (four or five years) you can continue for Ph. D. or 'un master'.

    I'd like you to give me the equivalence to the Spanish terms. I think it would be easier.

    Magg
     
  5. cristóbal Senior Member

    EEUU
    EEUU/Inglés
    OK, hmmm... undergraduate is the four or five years you do no matter what if you want a degree from a university. More or less, it is the same as licenciatura. Postgraduate, posgraduado, is anything that comes after that first degree. For basic purposes, a Master is a postgraduate degree (después de licenciatura), but as I said earlier, not always.
    How's that?
     
  6. Focalist Senior Member

    European Union, English
    Except that you can't really say "undergraduate degree" because, by definition, undergraduates do not have a degree -- and, equally, degree-holders are not undergraduates. That is why the obtaining of a degree is called "graduation". In Britain a BA/BSc is usually called a "first degree".

    F
     
  7. cristóbal Senior Member

    EEUU
    EEUU/Inglés
    Except that you can (and you do) say "undergraduate degree" because, by definition, undergraduate refers to all work done before one's first graduation from the university. I know, sometimes it's a hard concept to consider that we Americans are so paradoxical, but well, we are. ;)
     
  8. Focalist Senior Member

    European Union, English
    Exactly: to the work and not to the degree.

    I could understand "undergraduate certificate" or "undergraduate diploma", but an "undergraduate degree" still sounds to me about as logical as an "unmarried wedding-certificate". As you say, though, it's modern usage - so we shall just have to learn to live with it. (sigh)

    F
     
  9. cristóbal Senior Member

    EEUU
    EEUU/Inglés
    Well, I certainly see your point, but nevertheless... I don't think it's quite the same as an "unmarried wedding-certificate". You have to remember that undergraduate is serving the purpose of adjective here and specifying what the degree belongs to, all the work done before one's graduation. A "postgraduate degree" wouldn't make much sense either from the standpoint you're looking at it from.
     

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