Maturità Magistrale

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Ada 07, Mar 20, 2007.

  1. Ada 07 New Member

    Italy - Italian
    Salve,
    sto traducendo in inglese un diploma, ma non riesco a trovare la traduzione per
    "Istituto Magistrale"
    e
    "Diploma di Maturita' Magistrale"
    Sarei veramente grata a chiunque mi potesse aiutare.

    Grazie
    Ada 07
     
  2. Milvia Senior Member

    Northern Italy
    Italy Italian
    Qualcosa come "Teacher Training School" potrebbe andar bene, anche se non è proprio esattamente la stessa cosa
     
  3. virgilio Senior Member

    English UK
    Milvia,
    Non ti pare che "diploma" suggerisca piuttosto "certificate"?
    Virgilio
     
  4. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    Un diploma di maturità è (più o meno) l'equivalente del nostro "high school diploma" (AE).

    Quindi direi:

    Teacher-training high school diploma or

    High school diploma with specialization in teacher training
     
  5. Milvia Senior Member

    Northern Italy
    Italy Italian
    I'm having another try. What about:

    Teacher Certificate from Teacher Training School (?)

    (meaning you are a trained teacher and certified to teach: that's what the "diploma magistrale" used to allow you to do in the past)

    Would that make sense?:eek:
     
  6. Ada 07 New Member

    Italy - Italian
    Grazie a tutti per il vostro aiuto.
    Cosa ne pensate di:
    School leaving diploma of teacher training school
    Ciao
     
  7. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    Sounds good for British English; in American English, you'd be better off with High school diploma from...
     
  8. giro Junior Member

    Memphis
    English USA
    Okay, it's a graduation from a program that trains people to be teachers, and "maturità" apparently is normally equivalent to graduation from what we call high school, age 17 or 18, but I doubt that you can get a teaching certificate here in the States without a baccalaureate, normally 3 or 4 years beyond high school graduation. Can you become a teacher in Italy with an education that normally ends at age 18?
     
  9. montelatici Junior Member

    Italia, Toscana
    Italia Italiano
    Maturità requires two more years of school than a US high school. Depending on the month one is born, if one passes all years one would receive their maturità at the age of 19 or 20. A few years ago one could teach in elementary schools with this degree, (like an AA in the US), but this is no longer possible, a higher degree is required now.
     
  10. elena73

    elena73 Senior Member

    Tuscany
    ITALIAN
    I think it's important to underline that it's a HIGH SCHOOL diploma. Personally I'd choose:
    High school diploma with specialization in teacher training (as suggested by ElaineG)
     
  11. montelatici Junior Member

    Italia, Toscana
    Italia Italiano
    Currently, and for many years now la maturità from a liceo has had nothing to do with teaching. Teaching requires a minimum of a Laurea Magistrale (first university degree).
     
  12. elena73

    elena73 Senior Member

    Tuscany
    ITALIAN
    I don't think that:
    High school diploma with specialization in teacher training
    implies the concept 'having the legal right to teach'. You're just getting trained...
    (if that's however what you are referring to in your post no. 11, Montelatici)
     
  13. montelatici Junior Member

    Italia, Toscana
    Italia Italiano
    Yes.
     
  14. ToWhomItMayConcern Senior Member

    English (U.S.) & Italiano [native bilingual]
    The problem is, the whole system of secondary education in Italy is confusing. In Italy we have a plethora of five-year "high schools," and each of these is highly specialized. This is very different from high school in the U.S.
    In Italy, in order to teach elementary school you need to have a Master's Degree in teaching; and in order to enter the five-year Master's Degree program, all you need to have is a high school diploma--any high school diploma. So, a "High school diploma with specialization in teacher training" is pretty pointless.

    It is worth noting that secondary school in Italy used to be much more important than it is now--as someone mentioned, a five-year high school "diploma magistrale" used to be the only requirement for elementary school teachers. Secondary school has depreciated a lot over the years, so to speak, since its basic structure has remained largely the same as it was 50 years ago, even though these days most high school graduates go on to college (university)--at least, many more than 50 years ago. So why should we still have a zillion different kinds of high schools?

    Given this scenario, it's hard to come up with a proper English translation. The very concept is so un-English.

    </rant>

    EDIT: Not to mention that we also have zillions of 3-year Bachelor's Degree programs in Italy, which is also pointless and confusing. But that's off-topic.


     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2010
  15. elena73

    elena73 Senior Member

    Tuscany
    ITALIAN
    Even if it's off-topic: Not to mention that we also have zillions of 3-year Bachelor's Degree programs in Italy, which is also pointless and confusing. But that's off-topic. I DO AGREE WITH YOU.
     
  16. elfa

    elfa Senior Member

    Bath, England
    English
    I'm rather late to the party :) but if I can just throw in my two ha'pence worth, I agree with ElaineG's suggested translation, especially in view of TWIMC's very extensive explanations about the school system in Italy. It's impossible to get an exact equivalent of maturità magistrale, but I think High School Dipoma with specialisation in teacher training comes closest to it. To my BE ears, it doesn't imply you are qualified to teach. As it says on the tin, it is a High School Diploma...
     
  17. elena73

    elena73 Senior Member

    Tuscany
    ITALIAN
    Concordo con Elfa!
     
  18. ToWhomItMayConcern Senior Member

    English (U.S.) & Italiano [native bilingual]
    High School Dipoma with speciali{z/s}ation in teacher training

    Si`, dai. Anch'io. E` il male minore :)
     

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