"... may God bless"

Discussion in 'Ελληνικά (Greek)' started by RAAR, Jun 27, 2013.

  1. RAAR New Member

    Latvian
    Hallo!
    I'm trying to find correct translation for phrase " ... may God bless ".
    Searching in internet I found "Ο Θεός να ευλογεί" but not sure if it really contain " ... may " .
    Also I would appreciate if somebody could help me to translate the same " ... may God bless" in Hellenic (old Greek) language.

    RA
     
  2. karabalino New Member

    Greek
    You should not worry about the ''may'' thing, since by saying ''να ευλογεί'' means you are using subjunctive mood, which by itself contains the element of wishing. Example: Ο Θεός να μας ευλογεί = May God bless us. (precise and not rough translation). Hellenic? This a word which simply means greek, and does not refer to a particular stage in the development of the language. I dare to guess by the resemblance of the two words, that you probably mean Hellenistic Koine (Ελληνιστική Κοινή), the language spoken in Byzantium. In ancient greek, the mood used for expressing a wish was the optative, which by the time of the Hellenistic Koine, had become more or less obsolete, and was scarcely used. For instance, the new testament was translated from hebrew in this dialect (Hellinistic Koine), and there are very few examples of optative mood in it. The reason I am saying this, is because you should really ask a pro and not simply trust a native speaker on how you would phrase this in Hellenistic Koine. One possible way to say it, with the verb 'to help' could be Θεὲ βοήθει ἡμῖν, which is frequently found in many religious texts, using however the imperative. (God help us). If you simply want to say it in ancient greek, that would be Θεός βοηθοῖ (ἡμᾶς) = May God help (us), again with the verb 'to help', but in optative mood. Whether this sentence would be something people back then would actually say, I cannot tell and I really wish I could help you more. You should really ask a professional teacher about older forms of the greek language so as to be absolutely sure. Two useful phrases you will probably need, are 1) a very common everyday-speech phrase in contemporary greek. Ο Θεός να βάλει το χέρι του = May God help -'so that everything will be ok', is what is implied to be said afterwards. It is used as a solitary, self-standing sentence, no words before nor after it. The exact words mean: May God put His hand (!) -meaning, 'in the situation'-. They say it when they wish for a grave situation to have a happy ending. 2) The phrase meaning 'God save us' (in the sense of 'may God be taking care of us') Ο Θεός να μας φυλάει.
     
  3. sotos Senior Member

    Greek
    The expression in old Greek depends on the context. A Christian priest in "official" situation would say "Ευλόγησον Κύριε (or ευλόγησον ο Θεός) + object." For example, here, 2nd line https://sites.google.com/site/erosorthodoxias/%CF%80%CF%81%CE%BF%CF%83%CE%B5%CF%85%CF%87%CE%AD%CF%82%CF%84%CF%81%CE%B1%CF%80%CE%AD%CE%B6%CE%B7%CF%82
    "Lord bless our food and drink ..."
    "God may bless them" can be " Ευλόγησον αυτούς, Κύριε" http://eleusisdiagoridon.blogspot.gr/2012/04/blog-post_8544.html
    Syntax may vary a little.
     
  4. RAAR New Member

    Latvian
    Thank You for your help...
    This phrases will be engraved in our wedding rings, so the context is that God bless everything what is around us - people, things we do, be with us for rest of the life... etc. So its not just God bless her or bless this action or moment.

    May be in Greek there is different phrase which would suit situation?

    RA
     
  5. ireney

    ireney Modistra

    U.S.A.
    Greek Greece
    So a simple Εὐλόγησον Κύριε (Lord, bless) or Εὐλόγησον ὁ Θεός (God, bless) would do?
     
  6. karabalino New Member

    Greek
    Be that the case, the guys are right RAAR, it is simply what the priests say during weddings ''Εὐλόγησον Κύριε'', I apologize if I confused you.
     
  7. Andrious Senior Member

    How about "Ο Θεός μαζί μας" (May God be with us) or "Η Παναγιά μαζί μας" (May Holy Virgin be with us)?
     
  8. ireney

    ireney Modistra

    U.S.A.
    Greek Greece
    Andrious a) they're not exactly the same as "God bless (everything and everyone)" are they? Plus they are in modern, not ancient Greek. :)
     
  9. sotos Senior Member

    Greek
  10. RAAR New Member

    Latvian
    Hallo everyone!
    Thanks for help some time ago...
    I wouldn't make it without you...
    IMAG1522_1.jpg
     

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