me dañaron rosa tus espinas

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by omargosh, Dec 23, 2013.

  1. omargosh Junior Member

    Houston, TX
    English (US)
    La frase en cuestión—me dañaron rosa tus espinas—viene de una canción (Lluvia) y, pues, no la entiendo gramaticalmente. Supongo que "tus espinas" es el sujeto, pero no entiendo qué función tiene "rosa" (es como si fuera adverbio o algo así). Parece que algo falta o sobra o no sé qué. Tal vez con una traducción al inglés la entendería mejor (yo no sabría traducirla así como está). Gracias de antemano.
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    I think the idea is "your thorns left me red (or rather "pink").
     
  3. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    me dañaron, rosa, tus espinas.

    Would that work better?
     
  4. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    I think this is just a bit of poetic license, and isn't really grammatical. To me, the image is not one of color, but of the rose, which is beautiful but dangerous, because it can hurt you with its thorns. I'm not sure of a good translation, but maybe loosely:

    Lovely rose, but your thorns stuck me
     
  5. Cambria

    Cambria Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Español de España / Catalán
    It is a poetical way of expressing it, yes, but the key, as chileno says, is here:

    The sentence should be separated by commas. This way it is perfectly correct, because "rosa" acts as an "acotación" (I'm not sure how to say that in English, perhaps "a side note"), which is a part of the sentence that is included just to add information but it can be removed without altering the meaning. So, in fact, the sentence is just: "Me dañaron tus espinas". Perfectly grammatical.
     
  6. Cenzontle

    Cenzontle Senior Member

    English, U.S.
    I read "rosa" easily (and even more easily between commas) as a vocative, poetically addressing the "rose". Is that what "acotación" means?
    "I was hurt—you lovely rose [momentary epithet for addressing the lady-love]—by your 'thorns' [namely some injurious aspects of your behavior]."
     
  7. Cambria

    Cambria Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Español de España / Catalán
    Ah, that's true, right. And possibly a "vocative" requires the commas, too, so I assume that it can serve both purposes: to address the subject and to add information about what/who is the speaker addressing to. In any case, the sentence really needs those commas.
    An "acotación" is what I said: "a part of the sentence that is included just to add information but that it can be removed without altering the meaning".
     
  8. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Maybe it is Rosa, in which case it would mean she doesn't shave her legs very well... :rolleyes:

    @Gengo: stuck or pricked me?
     
  9. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Both are correct, but pricked is probably a bit more formal or poetic. I think some people avoid the verb "to prick" now because of its association with the noun prick.
     
  10. cesarduck Senior Member

    Guadalajara, Jalisco.
    Español - México
     
  11. Cambria

    Cambria Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Español de España / Catalán
    Pero es que sí que es gramáticamente correcto, tanto si es porque se trata de un vocativo, como si interpretas que es una acotación, la frase es correcta (con las comas, eso sí).
     
  12. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Sí, es verdad que con las comas es correcta. Cuando escribí mi primer post no había visto el de chileno, en el que menciona las comas.
     
  13. cesarduck Senior Member

    Guadalajara, Jalisco.
    Español - México
    Cambria si tu tienes los conocimientos entonces confiemos en ti.
    Pero Omargosh no es común escucharlo decir de esa manera al menos en México.
     
  14. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Correct. Although, I have always used "to prick" when it is about thornes, either stuck or prick when it is about needles or small pointy objects, and stuck in case of knives or similar bigger tools.
     
  15. omargosh Junior Member

    Houston, TX
    English (US)
    Thank you! Y'all are wonderful.
     

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