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Me parece aburrido.

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by david13, Jun 25, 2008.

  1. david13

    david13 Senior Member

    Pittsburgh
    USA - US English
    ¡Hola a todos!

    Como ya saben, "aburrido" significa tanto "tedioso" (Esta película es aburrida.) como "que no se divierte" (Estoy aburrido porque no hay nada que hacer por aqui.) El significado se pone obvio gracias al verbo (estar o ser).

    Sin embargo, ¿qué tal "este tío me parece aburrido"? ¿Significa "me da que este tipo se ve tedioso" o "me da que este tipo no disfruta de nada"? O ¿necesitamos más información para sacar la cuenta?

    Gracias por adelantado,


    David
     
  2. canton Senior Member

    Colombian Spanish
    Bueno, la verdad es que es ambiguo, pero el sentido más usual en ese caso es que el tipo es aburrido para quien habla.
     
  3. canton Senior Member

    Colombian Spanish
    Ah, y un detalle:
    El significado se pone hace/vuelve obvio gracias al verbo (estar o ser).
     
  4. unspecified

    unspecified Senior Member

    Boston, MA, USA
    English, USA
    As I understand things...

    Este tío me parece aburrido.
    That guy seems boring to me. (i.e. he gives me a boring impression)


    Me parece que este tío está aburrido.
    That guy seems bored to me.

    (EDIT: I took forever--as usual--to type my message; sorry if it seems as though I ignored the previous posts ;))
     
  5. david13

    david13 Senior Member

    Pittsburgh
    USA - US English
    Yeah, I do the same thing, taking so long to write my responses that by the time I finally submit my post it looks like a summary of what three or four others already have written but I had not seen prior to posting. I chalk that up to neurotic perfectionism, in my case. :)

    Me gusta mucho tu sugerencia de una claúsula subordinada para indicar que el tipo se siente aburrido. Sin embargo creo que parecer exige el subjuntivo -- Me parece que eso tío esté aburrido. ¿Me equivoqué?

    Gracias por tu respuesta y también a Canton por la suya.

    Saludos,

    David
     
  6. unspecified

    unspecified Senior Member

    Boston, MA, USA
    English, USA
    Yes, circumlocution and periphrasis are amazing! I abuse them often.

    Back on topic, though: No, that sentence doesn't need the subjunctive since verbs expressing a perception of reality (e.g. parecer, pensar, creer) are still assertions and you're not making any statement as to whether those perceptions be true to reality or not.

    On the other hand, subjunctive is required when the "perception" verb is negated. Though, in that case it's because you're not asserting what's stated in the subordinate clause; it's not a matter of doubt or subjectivity:

    Me parece que está aburrido, pero puede que me equivoque.
    No me parece que esté aburrido, pero puede que me equivoque.


    I think the confusion here may come from how people often use "like" or "as if" in a non-standard manner, in which they should have not been used at all. As in:

    It seems to me like that guy is bored.
    It seems to me as if that guy is bored.

    ...which are both obviously incorrect and should be:

    It seems to me that that guy is bored.


    -or-

    It seems to me as if that guy were bored (but somehow I know otherwise).
    Me parece como si este tío estuviera aburrido.

    ...as the case may be.

    Sorry if this got a bit pedantic at times; feel free to disregard the second half of the message. :)
     
  7. david13

    david13 Senior Member

    Pittsburgh
    USA - US English
    Hi unspecified,

    Thanks so much for the correction. I have some great cheat sheets on the subjunctive, including this one from Niles (Illinois) High School (yeah, high school), but I am still at the stage where I tend to overuse it (the subjunctive, not the cheat sheet).

    I think I just discovered my error: expressions of doubt take the subjunctive, but expressions of opinion take the indicative. Maybe I shouldn't admit this in a public forum, but I have been using the subjunctive when I was not entirely certain of the correctness of my assertions. If a subordinate clause could be ended with a trailing "in a manner of speaking" or "as it were" or "if you know what I mean" I expressed it in the subjunctive (in Spanish, of course.)

    How therapeutic, this thread! :)

    Gracias de nuevo y saludos,

    David
     

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