me quiso dar una embolia

Discussion in 'Medical Terminology' started by Trinadora, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. Trinadora Junior Member

    English - United States
    A patient says: "Hace cuatro años me quiso dar una embolia."

    Sorry, I have no other context. Can someone tell me how this translates into English?

    Here are my attempts:

    Four years ago I had an embolism.
    Four years ago I thought I might have had an embolism.
    Four years ago I almost had an embolism.
    Four years ago I had symptoms of an embolism.

    The "quiso dar" part is confusing for me. Thanks in advance for your help!
     
  2. Keahi Senior Member

    España
    castellano, Perú
    Hello.
    People think when they have symptoms similars to embolism, they have been pretty close to suffering an embolism.
    I think any doctors would diagnose "almost", perhaps their diagnose is "early" , then I think people supposed to have this problem.
    Your third sentence is the meaning in English.
    "... almost I had an embolism.".
    Please, correct my English. Thanks.
    A hug.
     
  3. ajodapo New Member

    English-USA, Spanish-El Salvador
    Hi Keahi, a couple of quick corrections, I put added words in bold and things to remove in red. I was not able to fully understand what you wanted to say in the second line. Hope it helps!

    Hello.

    People think that when they have symptoms similars to an embolism, they have been pretty come close to having suffering an embolism one.
    I think any doctors would diagnose "almost", perhaps their diagnose is "early" , then I think people supposed to have this problem.
    Your third sentence is what it means the meaning in English.
    "... almost I almost had an embolism.".
    Please, correct my English. Thanks.
    A hug.


     
  4. Keahi Senior Member

    España
    castellano, Perú
    Thank you.
    When no one corrects my mistakes I think I did it well.
    A hug.
     
  5. Lx_MDE New Member

    Spanish-Spain, Catalan
    This is indeed an informal way of saying in Latin America. It means the person did not have an embolism. I would translate it as "Four years ago I had symptoms of an embolism." if the person went to the doctor and found out they actually had some symptoms, or as "Four years ago I thought I might have had an embolism." if it was only what they thought but wasn't corroborated objectively.
    To me, the throd option "I almost had an embolism" is less accurate, but might also be acceptable in the right context.
     
  6. horsewishr

    horsewishr Senior Member

    Michigan (USA)
    English (Generic Midwest Variety)
    Trinadora, ¿a qué te refieres con emboiia? Si la frase "me quiso dar" es informal (como dice Lx_MDE), ¿sería mejor traducir embolia de manera igual? La verdad es que, a menos que sea médico, es poco probable que alguien diga "embolism" en inglés.

    Yo me imagino que la persona se está refiriéndose a un stroke, ¿no? O si no, un blot clot.
    Mi intento:
    Four years ago, I thought I was having a stroke.

    ¿Qué te parece?
     
  7. CleoCruz

    CleoCruz Junior Member

    On line
    Español -Chile
    Third option is correct!
     
  8. EricEnfermero Senior Member

    La UCI Neonatal
    US - English
    Agree with Lx_MDE and horsewishr, except that I think horsewishr means blood clot and not blot clot. The problem with the third choice is that there is no "almost" in these conditions. The stroke/clot exists or it does not exist, unless we're talking about something like a transient ischemic attack (TIA) - but even that is better phrased as a mini-stroke, not "almost" a stroke.
     
  9. JoeMerengues

    JoeMerengues New Member

    Glendale, CA U.S.A.
    Mexican Spanish
    Dear EricEnfermero,
    I think you are absolutely right when it comes to the diagnosis of the ailment from the medical viewpoint. However, when the patient has limited education, it is quite common to use that phrase "me quiso dar un...", to express "I almost had a...., but not quite". As a medical interpreter, I try to keep the same registrar and let the medical personnel figure out what the message is by themselves. It is their prerogative to inquire further for clarification if the message was not clear to them. I wouldn't go as far as to raise the registrar to something that was not expressed, such as "I believe I was about to experience a C.V.A..."
    ¡Un abrazo!
     
  10. CleoCruz

    CleoCruz Junior Member

    On line
    Español -Chile
    Joe, cannot agree more with you! :thumbsup:
     
  11. horsewishr

    horsewishr Senior Member

    Michigan (USA)
    English (Generic Midwest Variety)
    Yes, I meant blood clot. Sorry! I'm a terrible typer!
    Agreed.
     
  12. EricEnfermero Senior Member

    La UCI Neonatal
    US - English
    I know it's an old thread, but I thought I would clarify my response and provide an alternative:

    "I thought I was having a stroke."

    I don't think it would be necessary to introduce words like "believe" or "experience" or "CVA." As a nurse educator, a lot of my work involves making technical topics more understandable, so I'm sympathetic to the issue of not wanting to change registers. I just don't think it's necessary to change the register in order to avoid "almost."
     
  13. EricEnfermero Senior Member

    La UCI Neonatal
    US - English
    Never mind. I wasn't reading carefully and I see that that option was already presented.
     

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