"Me too" or "Me either" [Me neither]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by nasridine, Feb 10, 2006.

  1. nasridine Senior Member

    USA
    Chinese, China
    When people say: I don't like it. I can say " me either".
    But what if one say: "I never saw it" or "I hardly see anything". Should I say "me too" or "me either"
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. You could say Neither did I or Nor did I. I wouldn't say me too.
     
  3. nmuscatine Senior Member

    California
    English, USA
    You need to say "me neither" in response to all of those.
     
  4. river Senior Member

    U.S. English
    "Me neither" is an informal way of saying "neither do I."
     
  5. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    There is a looming generation of "Me either" coming along. It means "Neither do I". Looking at the words that make up "Me either," I can't attach any sensible meaning to their collocation.
    "I don't like chocolate-coated sausages," I said to WMPG.
    "Me either," said WMPG.
    "Neither do I," said Panj (in a gently-correcting kind of voice).
    "That's what I said," said WMPG (with all the exasperation that a 6-year-old can assemble).

    Edit in response to maxiogee's next post: WMPG = World's Most Perfect Granddaughter. She accompanies many of my posts here.
     
  6. Biloute Junior Member

    French, France
    Does it mean that one can never say "Me either" ?
     
  7. Matching Mole

    Matching Mole Senior Member

    England, English
    Only if you wish to copy youth-speak and those who speak it. It is ungrammatical, but if you want to accept it, that's up to you. I think it is more than "informal", because "informal" does not imply incorrect usage. This is a kind of youth vernacular, and you should only use it if you wish to identify with speakers in this group.
     
  8. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I can see that it's incorrect, but at the same time I think the most common thing you'd hear around me (in California) would be "me, neither", no matter what the age of the speaker. It's almost a set phrase, like "says you!" You're as likely to hear it from an 80-year-old as from a teenager.

    It is so common that "Neither do I" sounds as stiff as "It is I" in many casual conversations, even though they are both correct English.

    If I were writing something, I'd be sure to use "Neither do I." I think I would almost always choose "me, neither" in any casual conversation among friends or family, though. (Even stranger, I would use the long I sound for neither in "Neither do I" but the long E sound in "me, neither.")
     
  9. Matching Mole

    Matching Mole Senior Member

    England, English
    I agree with everything you said, JamesM, but isn't the topic "me either", rather than "me neither"? It was specifically the use "either" here that I was commenting on. I think of it in the same category as "could of" - somewhat beyond the pale.
     
  10. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    --I don't like this dress...It looks way too big on you.
    --Neither do I.
    --What's the matter with you, Silvia?
    --............:eek:
     
  11. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    Sorry. As I understood it, the question was about what is an appropriate response in agreement with a negative statement. You are correct that "me either" is in the title.

    I agree with you on "me either". I don't quite know what it means. I think it's just used in the same place as "me neither", much like "honed in" has horned in ;) on "homed in." It certainly doesn't make much sense if you try to correct it to "Either do I", does it! :)
     
  12. ElBoss New Member

    England, English
    "me either" is not correct English. "me neither" is correct English.

    I am not saying you won't hear some people, especially in the U.S., say it but it's not correct English.
     
  13. BKing New Member

    Austria, German
    I'm happy I found this thread.
    Thank you everybody for clearing this ("me either") thing up!

    As a non-native speaker I got confused recently because I got to know some americans and they all used "me either" instead of "me neither" and that didn't make sense to me. So school really taught me the correctly after all :)
     
  14. Saurabh Senior Member

    New Delhi City
    India-English & Hindi
    Hello Folks,

    I have gone through the above thread however, I still am not very sure about my doubt.

    Allen: I like painting on walls.
    Dave: Me either/ So do I/ Me too!

    According to me, grammatically it would be in this order of preference: So do I, Me too, Me either. However, I don't know whether "Me either" could work there or not.
    Since the above statement of Allen was in a positive mood. If it were in a negative mood say:
    Allen: I do not like painting on walls.
    Dave: Me neither/ Neither do I/Me too (not).
    Would my order of prefrence be okay as : Neither do I, Me too(not), Me Neither. I guess here "Me neither" could work unlike "Me either" in positive mood.
    Please help.
    Cheers,
    Sau...
     
  15. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Responding to the positive statement, "So do I," is correct.
    You will often hear "Me too," in casual conversation.
    See above for comments on "Me either," in general. Whatever you think of it grammatically, it is not appropriate as a way of agreeing with a positive statement.
    See also So do I vs me too.

    Responding to the negative statement, "Neither do I," is correct.
    You will often hear "Me neither," in casual conversation, and increasingly you will also hear "Me either."

    Perhaps it's dull and boring of me, but I'll stick with "So do I," and "Neither do I."
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009
  16. mplsray Senior Member

    Touchstone, Book 2A By Jeanne McCarten and Helen Sandiford is a text intended to teach English to high school students. In the section 2 "Grammar Responses with too and either" there is a box labeled "In conversation..." which says "People actually say Me either more often than Me neither." It is accompanied by a bar chart which shows "Me either" to occur about twice as often as "Me neither."

    I don't know whether the evidence for the conversational use of "Me either" comes from the Cambridge International Corpus, which was used for the writers when researching this book, or from some other source, and would like more information on the matter, but it seems to me that "Me either" may well fall into the category of informal standard English.
     
  17. clitia

    clitia Senior Member

    madrid, spain
    Spanish

    I always thought that the correct one was...neither me.
     
  18. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I'm not sure why you attribute this to American English. The British English speakers on this thread are the ones reporting this as common.

    "Correctness" can be a matter of degree. I know many English teachers who would object to using "me neither" since "me" is the object form.

    "Neither do/did/have/will I" is the safest choice in any situation where you might be graded, in my experience.

    This is not something I've heard around me at all. It sounds very odd to me.
     
  19. Saurabh Senior Member

    New Delhi City
    India-English & Hindi
    Okay, Friends.

    I already knew, " So do I", " Neither do I" etc. are grammatical and most preferable. I myself use them. However, My doubt has been about "Me either". My query was though "Neither do I" or "Me neither" could be an answer to a negative mood question like " I don't like painting on walls". So, on the same ground, "Me either" could be an answer to a positive mood question like "I like painting on walls"?
    I know it would be the most casual answer however, I want to know, could it be replied?
    Thanks,
    Sau.
     
  20. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    No, "Me either" is used only a "negative environment" when answering questions. The fact that either doesn't have an n as neither does, and that in other contexts either is used in positive sentences does not mean that it can be used to express agreement with positive statement. "Me either", if it is used, is used to express agreement with a negative statement.
     
  21. Saurabh Senior Member

    New Delhi City
    India-English & Hindi
    Thanks a lot, Cagey:).

    You have provided to the point answer. Now, I have understood properly.
    Cheers,
    Sau...
     
  22. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    The obvious point - too obvious to be made, perhaps - is that when you are saying that you share a negative point of view, you need to use a subject pronoun.

    Long form:

    A: I don't like carrots
    B: I don't like them either.

    I don't like them either -> I don't either -> neither do I (the preferred option of young codgers like me)

    To start this statement me, is to make a bad beginning, and to add either is to remove the negative force which you need.

    I'm sorry to learn that this is becoming a linguistic habit.
     
  23. Saurabh Senior Member

    New Delhi City
    India-English & Hindi
    Thanks, Thomas:).

    It too was helpful.
    Saurabh.
     
  24. Eskam Junior Member

    Swiss German
    How it is if I tell only about my actions?

    Par example:

    I didn't go to the party.
    I didn't go to the restaurant either. - (It's only ME who didn't go to anywhere)

    Or do I have to use "neither" here?

    I didn't go to the party.
    I didn't go to the restaurant neither.
     
  25. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Eskam, your first example in post 24 does NOT imply "It's only me who didn't go anywhere". Is the latter your interpretation of the example, or is it the idea that you wish to convey? Your first example simply means that you didn't go to the party or the restaurant.

    As for your second example:

    "I didn't go to the party."
    "I didn't go to the restaurant neither either." :tick:
     
  26. MikeLynn

    MikeLynn Senior Member

    I agree with this. :thumbsup: Neither do/did/have/had/will... is definitely the form I would choose when taking a test; any test. Me neither, me too seem to be pretty common in casual conversation, but I don't think I've ever heard "Me either." used as an agreement to a negative statement. Could it be that the phrase gets so slurred that the initial n in neither is basically not audible although it "it" there? Thank you for your contributions.
    M&L
     
  27. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    Use either after not because "not either" ~= "neither". Some possible rejoinders:

    I don't like it. [A simple negative statement.]
    I don't either.
    Neither do I.
    Me neither.

    I never saw it.
    [I would not say "I didn't either" here.]
    I never did either.
    Neither did I.
    Me neither.

    I hardly see anything.
    [I would not say "I don't either" here.]
    I hardly do either.
    Me neither.
    Me either. [Hardly is negative in construction, but not quite negative in meaning, so I might opt for neither or either here, depending on how much or how well I can (or can't) see.]

    I would probably not use "me neither" or "me either" in a formal setting.
     
  28. MikeLynn

    MikeLynn Senior Member

    Thank you for your reply Forero. With this meaning I would be quite comfortable with either if, and I repeat if, there was some negation preceding it - not, never or whatever (I didn't like it either. I haven't seen him either. etc.) By itself it sounds really funny:
    A: I didn't like the movie.
    B:Me either. :confused:
    I could swear I've never heard it and I've never ever said it myself. :)
    M&L
     
  29. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I have heard it a lot but have never liked it. I have also heard "not hardly" (e.g. "I don't hardly either"), which bothers me even more.
     
  30. MikeLynn

    MikeLynn Senior Member

    Thanks a lot Forero for your reply. As they say: you keep learning. However, if I heard "me either", clearly enunciated that way, without your post, I'd be really baffled :D
     
  31. pwmeek

    pwmeek Senior Member

    SE Michigan, USA
    English - American
    "Neither" is a response to a negative in the original question:

    "I didn't go to the party."

    "Me neither."

    As TT has pointed out (two and a half years ago), the negative can come elsewhere, but it has to be somewhere in the response. "Neither" is as good a place as any.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2012
  32. AliBadass

    AliBadass Senior Member

    IRAN
    persian
    A:I do not have any money. B:Me either/Me neither
    I have seen both answers(Me either/Me neither), but is there any differences between them or should we use each of them in special situations?

    <<Ali's thread has been merged with an earlier one>>
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
  33. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Me either is not grammatically correct. Do not use it.

    Personally, I would say: "Neither do I".
     
  34. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
    >> I have seen both answers (Me either/Me neither)

    I wonder where? Every time you've seen 'me either' in this context, it's been wrong.
     
  35. AliBadass

    AliBadass Senior Member

    IRAN
    persian
    Dear Beryl you can see(Me either) in Longman dictionary and now I wonder how could that be wrong when it is written in a dictionary.
     
  36. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
    Could you provide a link, perhaps?
     
  37. AliBadass

    AliBadass Senior Member

    IRAN
    persian
    I am afraid not but here I can copy it for you:
    either 3 adverb

    2 me either American English spoken used to say that a negative statement is also true about you : ‘I don’t have any money right now.’ ‘Me either.’





     
  38. perpend

    perpend Senior Member

    American English
    Hi Ali, I can confirm that people say "me either" in American English!

    If I heard either "me either" or "me neither" in the context of your OP, I wouldn't even bat an eye, and wouldn't find either of the versions wrong.

    I would just continue with the conversation.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
  39. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    Both "me neither" and "me either" are informal/slang. The grammatically correct reply is the one given by Swiss Pete (post #2 #33).
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
  40. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
    In that case, I retract. I had no idea that this was an item of American spoken English.

    By the looks of it though, it's non-standard American English.
     
  41. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    I share Beryl's distaste for 'me either' in this context in BE.

    It would raise eyebrows and be seen as wrong in the UK.
     
  42. DonnyB

    DonnyB Senior Member

    Coventry, UK
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I agree with Beryl and Thomas: I've never heard anyone say "me either" in BE. "Me neither" is used colloquially, but it's wrong: you should say "Neither do I".
     
  43. perpend

    perpend Senior Member

    American English
    I found the link to the info that Ali posted earlier:

    2: me either American English spoken used to say that a negative statement is also true about you: I don't have any money right now.' 'Me either.'


    http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/either_3

    Is this a reputable source?
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
  44. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Me either. Me neither. Neither have I.
     

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