Meaning of Veteran Status

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Snappy_is_here, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. Snappy_is_here Senior Member

    Kobe, Japan
    Japanese
    I am reading a company's in-house rules.
    "An employee must not engage in any threatening, intimidating or hostile activity, or use epithets or slurs that relate to race, color, religion, gender, marital status, national origin, citizenship, age, veteran status...."

    I think such corporate rules are not unusual these days.

    My question is whether "veteran status" refers the status of "someone who has been a soldier, sailor etc in a war" or "someone who has been working for a long time in the company"?
     
  2. bluegiraffe

    bluegiraffe Senior Member

    Nottingham, England
    English - England
    It could be either really. You'd have to ask the person who wrote them.
     
  3. Spira Senior Member

    South of France
    UK English
    In the USA veteran status would almost certainly mean "someone who has been a soldier, sailor etc in a war" (in fact, a war in which the US military was engaged).
     
  4. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    My guess is that in this case "veteran status" refers to your status as a veteran: If you didn't serve, then your status is negative. If you did serve, then your status is positive -- along with the subtleties of what branch of the armed forces you served with, did you serve in war or peacetime, and what did you do.

    The reason I'm guessing this is that a job applicant (or existing employee) could be discriminated against for being a veteran or for not serving, for being in the Coast Guard in South Carolina rather than in the Army in Iraq, etc. Since we don't know every employer, we have to take into account the fact that prejudices can go either way.
     
  5. Spira Senior Member

    South of France
    UK English
    You see? As an AE speaker, Copyright assumes automatically that "a veteran" means something military.
    So if your text is in an Amercian context, that is what it means.
     
  6. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Snappy, is this a Japanese company, or somewhere else?
     
  7. Snappy_is_here Senior Member

    Kobe, Japan
    Japanese
    Thank you everyone,
    This is not a Japanese company, but a multinational company.
    Therefore, what Copyright wrote, i.e., "Veteran status" refers to your status as a veteran, is what it meant.
     
  8. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Not true at all.

    I am a veteran whose college eduction was paid for by veteran's benefits and never served while the nation was at war, declared or otherwise.

    In the U.S., it almost certainly asks about service in one or more of the four military services and the U.S. Coast Guard, although it could be worded better.

    Some companies give some preference to those who have served.
     
  9. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Without knowing more about practice in the company, I don't think we can say for sure. 'Veteran' might even just be a sort of euphemism for 'old'.
     
  10. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    They have "age" in the rules, so I doubt of they would have it twice, or If they would use euphemisms in a company policy document.
     

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