meat cooked on a stick [kebab? shashlik?]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by KYC, May 31, 2010.

  1. KYC Senior Member

    Mandarin
    Hello, there:
    I am wondering how you call the food in the image I attached.
    [​IMG]

    I would like to eat __________.
    I don't think I can say barbecue, which speicifically refer to the equipment and the verb, right?

    Thanks a lot!
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2010
  2. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Those look like kebabs to me, KYC.

    For more about kebabs and British culture (;)) see this thread: more deadly than a kebab.
     
  3. shawnee

    shawnee Senior Member

    Melbourne
    English - Australian
    Kebab - Turkish dish
    Souvlaki - Greek dish
    Saté sticks - Malay dish
     
  4. MilkyBarKid Senior Member

    British English
    ...and in Asia and Eastern Europe, when the meat on the skewer is lamb

    shashlik
     
  5. shawnee

    shawnee Senior Member

    Melbourne
    English - Australian
    Yes, also shaslik, but I doubt its use throughout Asia. It is common to, but I'm not sure how confined to, the Middle East.
     
  6. KYC Senior Member

    Mandarin
    Lamb?:confused:
    Isn't it a sheep?
    What if it's pork or beef? Also, I am wondering what the genetic term is?
    Thanks a lot!
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2010
  7. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    We have here a list on non-English words to which I will add brochette.

    In English, I call it "meat on a stick."
     
  8. Matching Mole

    Matching Mole Senior Member

    England, English
    KYC, shashlik is understood to refer to a dish of lamb or mutton in particular. Kebab (in Britain at least) is more generic, and can be lamb, chicken, beef, etc. I never hear shashlik used as a generic term (in Britain), always as a specific dish as on a menu, etc. In Britain, kebabs on a small skewer are normally referred to as shish kebabs (or just shish), and those huge lumps of pressed meat on a sword-like skewer as doner or donar kebab.

    Shawnee, I expect that Asia in this context refers to those parts adjacent to the middle east (in Britain, for example, the word Asian refers to the subcontinent predominately).
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2010
  9. e174043

    e174043 Senior Member

    Ankara-Turkey(Türkiye)
    Turkish,Azerbaijani
    I'm Turkish:) These are Kebabs or Shish-Kebab
     
  10. anamsc Senior Member

    English-SF Bay Area
    In English, I've always called them "shish kebabs", never just kebabs or shashlik or any of those other terms people mentioned. If I were to go to a restaurant and see that they have something called shashlik that looks like shish kebabs, though, then I would call it shashlik (according to what's on the menu).
     
  11. pickarooney

    pickarooney Senior Member

    Provence, France
    English (Ireland)
    I call them skewer kebabs to avoid confusion.
    In France a 'chiche kebab' is made of mince, which would require some level of skin to put on a skewer!
     
  12. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    Many cultures have ways of cooking meat on a stick. Since English likes to adopt words from other languages, there are multiple words for "meat on a stick". The suggestions above are good. Off the top of my head, I can also think of "yakatori" from Japanese and "en brochette" from French.

    Without knowing more about the exact preparation, it's hard to narrow a small picture down to one particular recipe or culture.
     
  13. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Ah, but this is not always the case. The Turks make meatballs out of mince (plus ingredients that bind), put the balls on a skewer, grill them over charcoal and call the results şiş köfte ("shish keufte").

    There must be loads of regional/national names for the dish in the image.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2010
  14. e174043

    e174043 Senior Member

    Ankara-Turkey(Türkiye)
    Turkish,Azerbaijani
    Kebab is an Turkish traditional food. Actually, shish kebab and kebabs are not the same. Shish kebab is made from chopped meat which is skewered. But kebab is the name of whole food like shish kebab. For example , Adana Kebab, Urfa Kebab:) , Beyti, Iskender, all of these are kebabs.
     
  15. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    Since these dish is clearly East Asian I wouln't use şiş-kebab or any variant form of it but I would use the word Satay.
     
  16. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    How can you tell, bernd - is it the sauce, or perhaps the length of the sticks?

    (I'm not disagreeing, just wondering what clues you're using....)
     
  17. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Perhaps it's the fact that the sticks in the image are (appear to be) wooden, Loob. You don't get that with a shish kebab in Anatolia.
     
  18. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    1) The typical glossy look some Asian sauces produce.
    2) The size of the individual pieces of meat on the scewers (Turkish/Balkans varieties tend to have bigger pieces).
    3) The white spots which I think are sesame seeds.
    4) The table cloth.
    5) The Chinese characters on the photo.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2010
  19. anamsc Senior Member

    English-SF Bay Area
    I still would call it shish kebab, regardless of the origin!
     
  20. slowik Senior Member

    Polish
    In Poland we do use the word szaszłyk but we use it especially to talk about a stick with different pieces of food on. When we say szaszłyk we think of a stick with pepper, two types of meat, onion etc. So, since the word shashlik comes from or is connected to szaszłyk I think this word would not fit what we see in the image.
     
  21. KYC Senior Member

    Mandarin
    Thanks for all of your input.
    I didn't know that there are a lot of different names about it.
    berndf, I think you are absolutely qualified to be a detective.:)

    All of your input remindsms that I hear people call them satay when we go to exotic restaurants.
    I learn more .
    Thanks a lot!
     
  22. iskndarbey Senior Member

    Lima, Perú
    US, English
    Satay generally implies Indonesian or Malaysian, or at least general Southeast Asian. I think the analogous food in Chinese cuisine is called chuan, but that's not a word that's widely used in English. Personally I'd go with the more demotic if somewhat less prosaic "meat-on-a-stick".
     
  23. shawnee

    shawnee Senior Member

    Melbourne
    English - Australian
    Interesting! I have a hunch the subcontinent is excluded from the popular use of the term Asia here. If it hasn't been done before I think we might have a potential Culture Cafe or Etymology forum thread here.
     

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