1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Medical terms

Discussion in 'Medical Terminology' started by Drpuchupu, May 6, 2013.

  1. Drpuchupu New Member

    Ahmedabad
    India-Gujarati
    what is difference between dizziness and giddiness?
     
  2. otrodoctor Junior Member

    Español, Chile
    None except search engine popularity, greater for dizziness, and official status in MeSH (Medical Subject Headings), which is the NLM controlled vocabulary thesaurus used for indexing articles for PubMed


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/68004244
     
  3. Anmei Junior Member

    Omaha, NE EEUU
    USA-English
    There are several threads on each individual term, but this following addresses the exact same topic rather well:

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=986037

    Also from Word Reference:

    giddy
    /ˈɡɪdɪ/ adj ( -dier, -diest)
    • affected with a reeling sensation and feeling as if about to fall; dizzy
    • causing or tending to cause vertigo
    • impulsive; scatterbrained
    vb ( -dies, -dying, -died)
    • to make or become giddy
    Etymology: Old English gydig mad, frenzied, possessed by God; related to God

    dizzy /ˈdɪzɪ/ adj ( -zier, -ziest)
    • affected with a whirling or reeling sensation; giddy
    • mentally confused or bewildered
    • causing or tending to cause vertigo or bewilderment
    • informalfoolish or flighty
    vb ( -zies, -zying, -zied)
    • (transitive) to make dizzy
    Etymology: Old English dysig silly; related to Old High German tusīg weak, Old Norse dos quiet

    dizzy /ˈdɪzɪ/ adj ( -zier, -ziest)
    • affected with a whirling or reeling sensation; giddy
    • mentally confused or bewildered
    • causing or tending to cause vertigo or bewilderment
    • informalfoolish or flighty
    vb ( -zies, -zying, -zied)
    • (transitive) to make dizzy
    Etymology: Old English dysig silly; related to Old High German tusīg weak, Old Norse dos quiet

    Dizzy/dizziness is more commonly used medically than giddy.
     
  4. EricEnfermero Senior Member

    La UCI Neonatal
    US - English
    This thread and the link provided are both interesting to me. In common usage, I would never think to equate dizziness and giddiness. To me, giddiness is a silly, excited feeling, while dizziness is a spinning sensation. I would have said that they are two distinct concepts. I guess I learn something every day.
     

Share This Page