Megvan, megvagyok

Discussion in 'Magyar (Hungarian)' started by Sima278, May 31, 2012.

  1. Sima278 New Member

    Boston, MA
    English
    I have so often seen a form of the verb "megvan" used, but in general, I cannot come up with a completely satisfactory definition, or how it is used. I get the impression that sometimes "Megvagyok" sort of means "I am fine." Is that correct? However, it seems it has other uses as well.
     
  2. Puppancs

    Puppancs New Member

    Magyar - Hungarian
    Van generally means exists, it is, there is. Meg is a preverb, which usually change the aspect from inperfective to perfective. So megvan is used when something wasn't there or was lost before etc. For example, when you find the solution for a problem you'll say Megvan!, girls refer to their periods when they say megvan, or the teacher asks the students on a trip Mindenki megvan? to check the number of them.
    If someone says or replies Megvagyok, that means I am fine, Not too bad etc.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2012
  3. francisgranada Senior Member

    Slovakia
    Hungarian
    Other examples:

    Megvan az órád? Have you got you watch? (i.e. the one you couldn't find before ...)
    Megvan a pénzem az autóra. I've got/prepared/to disposition the money for the car (i.e. I want to by a car and finally I've all the necessary amount of money)
    Megvan a véleményem róla. I have my opinion on him (i.e. a concrete, "conclusive" opinion)
    Végre megvan házifeladatom. Finally, I've (done) my homework (i.e. it's finally ready, finished, prepared)

    So, as Pupancs have already said, megvan is used when something wasn't there or was lost before, but also when before something was not yet to disposition, was not ready, prepared etc ...

    The negative form of megvan is nincs meg.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2012
  4. Sima278 New Member

    Boston, MA
    English
    Köszönöm szépen! That makes it much clearer, and it seems I was right about "megvagyok".
     
  5. Puppancs

    Puppancs New Member

    Magyar - Hungarian
    You were right, however, if someone asks you 'Are you ready? Can we go/start/etc. now?' you can say 'Yes, megvagyok, we can go/start/etc. now'.
    Depending on the context megvagyok could mean I'm fine, I'm ready, I'm finished and so on.
     
  6. francisgranada Senior Member

    Slovakia
    Hungarian
    As to megvagyok, as a possible answer to "How are you?": for me it is rather a "neutral" answer, something like "not too bad", "nothing new about me", "quite well" ... (i.e. not too optimistic, but neigther too negative ...). Perhaps, when one is o.k. and feels well, then "Köszönöm jól (vagyok)" is a more "pleasent" answer.

    (at least, this is my feeling, not a "rule", of course :) ...)
     
  7. francisgranada Senior Member

    Slovakia
    Hungarian
    I agree, but I'd say that it really depends on the context, i.e. this is not a generally appliable answer. With other words, megvagyok (megvagy, megvan ...) does not automatically substitute the words like ready, prepared, finished, found, have got etc...
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2012
  8. Zsanna

    Zsanna ModErrata

    Hungary
    Hungarian - Hungary
    Welcome, Sima278 on our forum!:)
    I agree with francis about this aspect.
    In English "nothing to complain about" (which could be another explanation of the attitude behind it, translated word by word) may not give back exactly the same meaning but it is difficult to explain why. In any case the speaker doesn't want to go into details about his problems even he has any, either because he doesn't have the time, or his audience is not the right one for that (doesn't want to expose himself or become a "burden") etc., in an extreme case it could almost indicate (a casual) "none of your business" in a polite way.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2012
  9. stevens37 New Member

    Vienna
    Hungarian
    For " I'm ready " I would say " kész vagyok "

    As a possible answer to "How are you?": " megvagyok " may suggest that
    I don't feel good at all but don't want to complain.
     

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